Thai Pork Tenderloin Salad with Napa Cabbage

I received the most beautiful Napa cabbage in my CSA share this week. The leaves are so tender, and yet crunchy, they are absolutely perfect for a salad. This dish caught my eye because it was so colorful, bright with flavor, healthy, and a little bit “out of the box” for me.

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Melissa Clark. I am bringing it to share at Fiesta Friday #88, co-hosted by Julie @ Hostess at Heart and Liz @ Spades, Spatulas, & Spoons. Happy October!

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

For the Marinade & Dressing:

  • 1 ½ to 2 pounds boneless pork tenderloin (usually 2 tenderloins)
  • ⅔ cup minced shallots (about 4 shallots)
  • ⅔ cup chopped cilantro leaves and tender stems
  • 5 tablespoons light brown sugar, separated
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced in a garlic press
  • 5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 5 tablespoons peanut or grapeseed oil
  • Juice and zest of 4 limes
  • 3-inch piece peeled ginger root, grated
  • 2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
  • ½ teaspoon coarse salt, more to taste
  • 1 to 2 Thai bird, serrano or jalapeño chile peppers, seeded and minced

For the Salad:

  • 8 cups Napa or regular cabbage, thinly sliced (about 1/2 of a large head)
  • 5 whole scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 2 small Kirby or Persian cucumbers, thinly sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 ½ cups cilantro leaves
  • 1 ½ cups mint leaves (I omitted the mint)
  • 1 cup basil leaves
  • 1 ¼ cups roasted cashews or peanuts, toasted and chopped
  • ¼ cup unsweetened coconut chips or large flakes, toasted, optional

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, combine shallot, cilantro, 2 tablespoons of the sugar, garlic, soy sauce, peanut or grapeseed oil, lime zest and juice, grated ginger, fish sauce, salt and chile. Pulse to mince the shallots, cilantro, garlic, and chiles- as well as to combine the mixture.
  2. Remove three-quarters of the mixture; reserve to use as the dressing. Add the remaining 3 T sugar and purée until a smooth, loose paste forms. This is the marinade.
  3. Pat the pork dry with a paper towel. Place tenderloin in a large bowl and spread the paste all over pork. Marinate at room temperature for 2 hours, or cover and refrigerate up to 24 hours; turn the tenderloin occasionally. (I marinated the meat for 12 hours in the refrigerator.)
  4. Light the grill or heat the broiler and arrange a rack at least 4 inches from the heat. (Mine was about 6 inches away.) Grill or broil pork, turning occasionally, until well browned and meat reaches an internal temperature of 135 degrees, 4 to 10 minutes per side depending upon the heat of your broiler or grill. Keep an eye on it so it doesn’t overcook. Let meat rest while you prepare the salad. (Or, cook the pork 1 or 2 hours ahead and serve it at room temperature.)
  5. In a large bowl, combine the salad ingredients, reserving the herbs, cashews and coconut. (I omitted the coconut.)
  6. Whisk the dressing and use just enough to dress the salad, tossing to combine. Let sit for a few minutes for the flavors to meld, then right before serving, add herbs and toss again.
  7. To serve, slice the pork. Arrange salad on a platter or serving plates and top with sliced pork. Scatter cashews and coconut on top, drizzle with a little more of the remaining dressing, to taste, if desired.

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Three Years Ago:

Whole Wheat Gooseberry & Almond Squares

Gooseberries were completely new to me this summer. When I received my second batch of gooseberries in my CSA share, I was stumped. I thought I had peaked with my Gooseberry & Blueberry Galette. ;) I searched far and wide for a special way to use them. This crumbly, shortbread-like bar was a perfect choice! We ate them for dessert with ice cream, and then ate leftovers for breakfast. They were great with a cup of coffee. :)

This recipe was adapted from Good Food Magazine, via BBC’s Good I used whole wheat pastry flour instead of white self-rising, light brown sugar instead of muscovado, and granulated sugar instead of caster. Earthy and nice.

  • 250 g (2 sticks, 1 cup) chilled unsalted butter, chopped
  • 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 3 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp coarse salt
  • 125 g ground almonds (almond flour)
  • 125 g light brown sugar
  • 350 g fresh gooseberries
  • 85 g granulated sugar, plus 1-2 T extra for sprinkling
  • 50 g slivered almonds
  1. Heat oven to 325 F (convection) / 170 C fan. Line a 9 x 13-inch (27 x 18-cm) baking pan with parchment paper.
  2. Whisk to combine the flour, baking powder, and salt.
  3. Rub the butter into the flour mixture, ground almonds, and light brown sugar to make crumbs, then firmly press two-thirds into the base and sides of the prepared pan.
  4. Toss the gooseberries with the granulated sugar, then scatter over the top.
  5. Mix the flaked almonds into the remaining crumbs, then scatter over the gooseberries.
  6. Bake for 45 minutes or up to 1 hour, until golden and the fruit is bubbling a little around the edges.
  7. Sprinkle with the remaining granulated sugar, then cool in the pan.
  8. Cut into squares and enjoy with a cup of coffee or tea or serve as a dessert with ice cream or fresh whipped cream.

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Green-Lentil Curry

I just feel so healthy eating a dish like this. :) Served over brown rice with yogurt and warm naan, this dish is an amazing complete vegetarian meal. The lentils have a little bit of heat and the yogurt tempers it perfectly.

This recipe was adapted from Food and Wine, contributed by Madhur Jaffrey. It was voted one of their “Best New Vegetarian” dishes. I believe it! :) I doubled the recipe, used French green lentils, a combination of ghee and coconut oil, and substituted beet and turnip greens for the kale. Satisfying and tasty!

Yield: Serves 6 to 8

  • 2 teaspoon finely grated ginger
  • 4 garlic clove, put through a garlic press
  • 4 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3 tablespoons ghee
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 2 large shallots, minced
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste mixed with 2 tablespoon of water
  • 2 1/2 cups dried French green lentils
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 8 ounces green beans, cut into 3/4-inch lengths
  • 8 ounces kale, or other greens stemmed and leaves cut into ribbons (I used about 10 cups of mixed beet & turnip greens)
  • 2 medium carrots, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups finely chopped cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • coarse salt, to taste
  • brown Basmati rice, warm naan, and plain Greek yogurt, for serving
  1. In a small bowl, combine the ginger, garlic, coriander and ground cumin. Stir in 1/2 cup of water to make a paste.
  2. In a small skillet, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the cumin seeds and cook over moderately high heat for 5 seconds, just until sizzling.
  3. Add the shallot and cook, stirring, until lightly browned, about 1 minute. Add the spice paste and let cook until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 2 minutes.
  4. Stir in the tomato paste and cook until thick, about 1 minute longer. IMG_0461
  5. In a saucepan, combine the lentils with the turmeric and 10 cups of water; bring to a boil. Cover partially and simmer over low heat for 20 minutes, until the lentils are barely tender.
  6. Add the green beans, greens, carrot, three-fourths of the cilantro and the cayenne and season with salt.
  7. Cook until the lentils and vegetables are tender, 15 minutes.
  8. Scrape in the spice paste and the remaining cilantro. Simmer for 5 minutes, then serve.

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Lobster & Corn Chowder

This chowder tastes so luscious and rich but it is completely creamless. It doesn’t even have any butter! The “creaminess” is from puréed corn. Its rich and intense flavor is from the homemade stock which is made from the lobster shells and corn cobs. Mmmm. :)

This recipe was adapted from Martha Stewart Living. I used 2 lobster tails instead of 1 whole lobster, increased the amount of corn, and added leeks. We ate it with French rolls and green salad. Healthy and wonderful!

Yield: About 6 cups, Serves 4 to 5 as a main course

Total Time: about 2 hours

  • 3/4 to 1 pound lobster tails (I used 2)
  • 8 fresh corn cobs, kernels removed and cobs reserved
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 leeks, halved and cut into 1/2-inch moons
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 5 large garlic cloves, minced
  • coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • vegetable stock, chicken stock, or clam juice, as needed
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives
  1. Prepare an ice-water bath. Bring 8 cups water to a boil in a large stockpot. Reduce heat to medium-low. Place lobster into water, and simmer, covered, for 8 minutes. (Do not let water boil.) Transfer lobster tails to ice-water bath using tongs; reserve cooking liquid. Let stand for 10 minutes to cool.
  2. Crack lobster tails and remove meat; reserve shells. Coarsely chop meat. (You should have about 1 cup.) Refrigerate until ready to use. (Note: At this point, the lobster meat can be refrigerated overnight.)
  3. Return shells to pot with cooking liquid. Add reserved cobs. Simmer, covered, over medium-low heat for 35 minutes. Strain stock through a fine sieve into a bowl; discard solids.
  4. Meanwhile, soak the leeks in a bowl of cold water. Swish to clean. Remove leeks from the top allowing any sand or grit to settle on the bottom of the bowl.
  5. Heat oil in a medium stockpot over medium heat. Cook corn kernels, leeks, onion, garlic, and 3/4 teaspoon salt, covered, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 15 minutes.
  6. Add 5 cups lobster stock, and cook for 15 minutes. (I had to supplement with chicken stock because I didn’t have 5 cups of lobster stock! Clam juice would also work well as a supplement.) Let cool slightly.
  7. Using a slotted spoon, set aside 1 1/2 cups corn mixture.
  8. Purée remaining corn mixture and strained liquid in a blender or Vitamix until smooth.
  9. Working in batches, strain soup through a large fine-mesh sieve, and return to the pot with reserved corn and lobster meat.
  10. Cook over medium heat until warmed through.
  11. Stir in chives, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and some pepper. Serve with lemon wedges and garnish with additional chives, if desired.

Note: The soup can be refrigerated for up to 4 days.

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Clams Casino #2

What is happening!?!? This post is very belated. I made this appetizer to bring to my Clams Casino-loving friends’ house for the Fourth of July this summer… Well, I think I know what is happening! I am super behind on my blog posts, that is what is happening. :/ I’m happy to report that Littleneck Clams are still readily available! :)

I have made Clams Casino only one other time in the past. (to see the post click here) This new version has several modifications from the first. It omits the breadcrumbs (a selling point for me), keeps the clams whole, and includes pancetta instead of bacon. This recipe was adapted from Giada De Laurentiis via I cleaned and cooked the clams as I had done in my previous dish. I also adjusted the amount of most of the ingredients and added strained clam juice to the filling. It’s a great appetizer for a crowd!

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 ounces sliced pancetta or bacon, finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups finely diced red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped shallots
  • 4 large garlic cloves, minced
  • rounded 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 6 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan, divided
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 30 medium (2 1/2-inch) littleneck clams
  • lemon wedges for garnish, if desired

Note: The clams can be stored for a day in a bowl in the coldest part of the refrigerator.

  1. Begin by cleaning the clams. Rinse them thoroughly. Put them in a large bowl with very cold water, and stick the bowl in the refrigerator. This will give the clams the chance to spit out any sand or grit that may have gotten inside. After about 30 minutes (or up to an hour), drain the bowl of water, and refill with fresh cold water. Refrigerate. After the second soaking, scrub them with a kitchen brush.
  2. Cook the clams: Preheat the broiler to high (I set it to Broiler-Max, 500 degrees). Place the clams on a large, heavy baking sheet in a single layer. Place under the broiler, and broil for about 3 to 5, or until the clams have opened completely.
  3. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and reserve the clam juice that has dripped into the pan. Strain the clam juice in a coffee filter to remove any bits of shell or grit. (I used 2-3 tablespoons of this strained clam juice in the filling.)
  4. Remove the clam from inside the shell with a spoon. Set aside.
  5. Gently twist the clam shell at the hinged side to separate the halves. Clean any remnants of clam from the shell with a knife. Reserve bottom shells.
  6. Make the Filling: Heat the oil in a heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add the pancetta and sauté until crisp and golden, about 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a plate.
  7. Add the bell pepper, shallots, garlic, and oregano to the same skillet and saute until the shallots are tender and translucent, about 5 minutes.
  8. Add the wine and simmer until it is almost evaporated, about 2 minutes.
  9. Remove the skillet from the heat and cool completely. Stir the reserved pancetta, 2 or 3 tablespoons of the strained clam juice, and 3 tablespoons of Parmesan cheese into the vegetable mixture. Season the mixture, to taste, with salt and pepper.
  10. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.
  11. Line a heavy large baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. Arrange the clams in the reserved shells on the baking sheet. Spoon the vegetable mixture atop the clams, dividing equally and mounding slightly. Sprinkle with the remaining 3 tablespoons of Parmesan.
  12. Bake until the clams are just cooked through and the topping is golden, about 10 minutes.
  13. Arrange the clams on the platter. Serve with lemon wedges, if desired.

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Two Years Ago:

Red Pepper-Saffron Risotto

Woo hoo! My husband bought a shiny new stainless steel pressure cooker for me! <3 This is the first dish I’ve made in it. I LOVE pressure cooker risotto! I have been receiving tons of red long peppers in my CSA share so this recipe seemed like the golden opportunity to break in my new fancy pot. :)

This dish had such a beautiful color from not only the red peppers, but also from the saffron. The saffron significantly enhanced the flavor as well. Lovely!

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Martha Rose Shulman. I modified the recipe by doubling the peppers (I had so many, I had to use them!), using homemade stock, and by cooking the risotto in a pressure cooker. Pretty and delicious. :)

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

  • 6 to 7 cups chicken or vegetable stock (I used homemade turkey stock)
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup finely chopped onion or shallot
  • 3-4 plump garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 large red peppers, finely diced (I used 5 red long peppers)
  • coarse salt, to taste
  • 1 ½ cups arborio rice
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • a generous pinch of saffron threads
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, or a mixture of parsley and thyme
  • 2 ounces Parmesan cheese, grated, about 1/2 cup
  1. In a 5 to 7 quart pressure cooker, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook until softened, about 2 minutes.
  2. Add the garlic, peppers, and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring, until the peppers are limp and fragrant, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  3. Add the rice and stir over medium heat until the grains are separate and beginning to crackle, about 3 minutes.
  4. Rub the saffron threads between your fingers and add to the rice.
  5. Add the unheated stock and the wine. Stir to combine. Bring to a boil.
  6. Lock the lid in place and bring to high pressure over high heat. Adjust the heat to maintain medium-high pressure. (On my new pot, the pressure should only reach the first red line.) Cook for 7 minutes.
  7. Release the pressure according to the manufacturer’s instructions or place the pot under running (trickling) cold water. Carefully open the lid, being careful of the steam.
  8. Stir in the cheese; taste and adjust the seasonings. Serve immediately, sprinkled with the herbs.

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Whole Wheat-Bartlett Pear Crumb Cake

This cake was nutty, earthy, and really really moist. The entire house smelled absolutely incredible while it baked- much of the credit should be given to the orange zest in the batter. Even more wonderful orange flavor was added after the cake was removed from the oven when fresh orange juice was drizzled all over the top. Fabulous!

This recipe was adapted from Huckleberry: Stories, Secrets, and Recipes from our Kitchen by Zoe Nathan with Josh Loeb and Laurel Almerinda. I weighed whole roasted almonds and then finely ground them in a mini food processor instead of using store-bought almond flour. I used fat-free Greek yogurt instead of whole plain yogurt. I also substituted oat bran for the toasted wheat germ in the original recipe. Wheat bran or ground flaxseed would also work as substitutes. I also baked the cake in a 9-inch springform pan instead of a 10-inch cake pan.

The authors offer seasonal adaptations to this recipe by substituting blueberries, raspberries, cranberries, apricots, peaches, or figs for the pears. Yummy!

Yield: Makes one 9-inch cake

For the Topping:

  • 1/2 cup (110 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 55 g (1/2 cup plus 2 T) almond flour
  • 20 g (1/4 cup plus 2 T) rolled oats
  • 50 g (1/4 cup) granulated sugar
  • 30 g (1/4 cup) whole wheat flour
  • 3 T all-purpose flour
  • 2 T oat bran, toasted wheat germ, wheat bran, or ground flaxseed
  • 2 T light brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp coarse salt
  • 20 g (1/4 cup) sliced almonds

For the Cake:

  • 170 g (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, cubed, at room temperature
  • 200 g (1 cup) granulated sugar
  • 2 T light brown sugar
  • 3/4 tsp coarse salt
  • 1 T pure vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 160 g (1 1/4 cups) all-purpose flour
  • 55 g (3/4 cup) oat bran, toasted wheat germ, wheat bran, or ground flaxseed
  • 25 g (1/4 cup) almond flour
  • 3 T rye flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 cup (240 ml) plain yogurt (I used fat-free Greek yogurt)
  • zest of 1 orange, *fruit reserved*
  • 3 pears, peeled and thickly sliced into 6 pieces each (I used Bartlett pears)


To Make the Topping:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the butter, almond flour, oats, granulated sugar, whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, wheat germ, brown sugar, and salt. Blend with a pastry blender until homogenous.
  2. Add sliced almonds and blend with your fingers. Refrigerate until needed.

To Make the Cake:

  1. Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Line and grease a 9-inch springform pan with parchment paper and cooking spray.
  2. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and salt on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes.
  3. Incorporate the vanilla and eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Be sure to scrape the sides of the bowl well.
  4. Pause mixing and all the all-purpose flour, wheat germ, almond flour, rye flour, baking powder, baking soda, yogurt, and orange zest. Mix cautiously, just until incorporated. Do not over mix!
  5. Scoop the batter into the prepared pan and cover evenly with the pears.
  6. Top with the crumble, allowing a little fruit to poke through.
  7. Bake for 1 hour 5 minutes or up to 1 hour 15 minutes, or until a cake tester comes out clean. Do not over bake!
  8. Allow to cool for 15 minutes in the pan; then squeeze the orange over the entire cake.
  9. Remove the side of the pan and gently pull the parchment paper from every nook and cranny of the cake.

Note: This cake is best served the day it is made, but it will keep, tightly wrapped, for up to 2 days at room temperature.

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Pesto Polenta with Fresh Tomatoes

This is a fast full-flavored dish. Healthy too! I always forget about how much I enjoy creamy polenta. :) We ate it for dinner but it would also be wonderful for brunch.

This recipe was adapted from Food and Wine, contributed by Todd Porter and Diane Cu. I increased the salt, doubled the tomatoes, and made homemade pesto. The pesto recipe is from How to Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman. Tasty!

Yield: Serves 3 (in my house!) or 4

For the Pesto: (Makes about 1 cup)

  • 2 loosely packed cups fresh basil leaves, rinsed and dried
  • coarse salt
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 T pine nuts or walnuts
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, or more to taste
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan or pecorino Romano

For the Dish:

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup polenta
  • 1/2 tsp coarse salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup chopped tomatoes (I used Campari)
  • 3/4 to 1 cup pesto

To Make the Pesto:

  1. Combine the basil with a pinch of salt, the garlic, the nuts, and about half of the oil in a food processor or blender.
  2. Process, stopping to scrape down the sides of the container if necessary and adding the rest of the oil gradually.
  3. Add more oil if you prefer a thinner mixture. (Sometimes I add a little bit of stock instead to achieve the same result.)
  4. Stir in the cheese.

To Finish the Dish:

  1. In a large pot, bring the water to a boil. (I use a cast iron pot.) While whisking, gradually pour the polenta into the water.
  2. Reduce the heat to simmer or low and continue whisking for an additional minute.
  3. Continue cooking for about 20 to 30 minutes, stirring every 5-10 minutes, making sure to scrape the bottom of the pot.
  4. Remove the polenta from the heat when it is tender and creamy and has reached your desired thickness.
  5. Stir the salt and butter into the polenta until the butter is melted.
  6. Scoop polenta out onto plates. Top each with about 1/4 cup pesto. Divide tomatoes among plates. Serve. (We individually mixed together all of the ingredients before digging in!)

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Two Years Ago:

Basil Baked Salmon with Tomato Salad

It’s the last official weekend of the summer. :( As much as I love autumn, I know that the change of season also means we are getting closer to cold weather… which I absolutely dread. Ugh.

This meal bridges the summer and fall seasons. It was as torn as I am to leave summer behind and embrace the cooler weather! :/ The salmon is smothered with summery fresh pesto accompanied by autumn-esque roasted sunshine squash and potatoes, as well as fabulous sautéed CSA chard on the side. The tomato salad was literally the icing on the cake (salmon)! :) It was great to make with late summer tomatoes, backyard basil and fresh CSA vegetables.

This recipe was adapted from Food and Wine, contributed by Ian Knauer. I increased the proportion of sauce to salmon and used grape instead of cherry tomatoes. I am always a little bit nervous when cooking fish… I cooked the salmon for the 15 minutes as specified in the recipe, but next time would start checking the fish at 10 or 12 minutes. Such a healthy and fresh meal. :)

Yield: Serves 2

  • 2 (8 ounce) wild salmon filets
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1 cup basil leaves, plus 2 to 4 more leaves
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, separated
  • 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, halved or quartered
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. ( I used the convection setting.)
  2. In a food processor with the motor running, drop the garlic clove into the feed tube and run the motor until it is finely chopped.
  3. Add the 1 cup of basil, pine nuts, and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper, then pulse until finely chopped.
  4. With the motor running, pour in 3 tablespoons of the oil until combined.
  5. Place the salmon on an oiled baking sheet, then divide the basil mixture between the salmon, then top each filet with 2 small or one large basil leaf.
  6. Bake the salmon until just cooked through, about 10 to 15 minutes.
  7. While the salmon bakes, in a bowl, stir together the tomatoes, vinegar, 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper, and the remaining 1 tablespoon oil.
  8. Top the salmon with the tomato salad and serve.

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Two Years Ago:

Za’atar Rubbed Pork Tenderloin

This was such a lovely dinner, I felt like I should have been making it for a dinner party! My family and I did enjoy it… and we didn’t have to share. ;) We ate this main dish along with Spicy Israeli Couscous with Summer Squash. Great.

This recipe was adapted from Food and Wine, contributed by Grace Parisi. I made my own za’atar blend and included the ingredients and instructions below.

I am bringing this boldly flavored dish to share at Fiesta Friday #86, co-hosted by Judi @ Cooking with Aunt Juju and Quinn @ Dad Whats 4 Dinner. Enjoy!!

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

For the Za’atar:

  • 1 T thyme
  • 1 T sesame seeds, toasted in a dry skillet and coarsely pulsed in a spice grinder
  • 1 tsp sumac
  • 1/4 tsp coarse salt

To Finish the Dish:

  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • coarse Kosher salt
  • Two 12-ounce pork tenderloins, sliced crosswise 1 1/2 inches thick and pounded 1/2 inch thick
  • 2 poblano peppers
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 pint grape tomatoes, halved
  1. Make the Za’atar: Toast the sesame seeds in a dry skillet until lightly toasted. Pulse in a spice grinder until a powder is formed. Combine with sumac, thyme, and coarse salt.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the za’atar with the oil. Add the pork, turn to coat and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, roast the poblanos directly over a gas flame or under a broiler, turning frequently, until blackened; transfer to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let cool slightly. Peel and seed the chiles; cut into thin strips.
  4. In a large nonstick skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil from the pork marinade. Add the pork and cook over high heat, turning once, until white throughout and lightly browned, 5 minutes. Transfer the pork to a platter.
  5. Add any remaining marinade oil to the skillet. Add the onion and poblano and cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until the onion is softened, 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and toss. Add 1/2 cup of water and cook until the tomatoes are just softened, 4 minutes.
  6. Spoon the tomato-poblano sauce over the pork and serve.

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Two Years Ago:

Oven-Roasted Chicken Shawarma

The New York Times described this dish as “an oven-roasted version of the classic street-side flavor bomb usually cooked on a rotisserie.” What a perfect description! This dish is insanely flavorful. We ate it with chopped cucumbers and tomatoes, wheat flatbread, bulgur pilaf, and “white sauce.” The traditional white sauce that is served with this dish is plain yogurt or sour cream (I used sour cream on this occasion) mixed with a little bit of coarse salt, garlic, and lemon juice. It can also be served with hot sauce.

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Sam Sifton. My husband said he would eat it every day. :) Fabulous!

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

  • 2 lemons, juiced
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled, smashed and minced
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • A pinch ground cinnamon
  • Red-pepper flakes, to taste
  • 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 1 large red onion, peeled and quartered
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  1. Prepare a marinade for the chicken: Combine the lemon juice, 1/2 cup olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper, cumin, paprika, turmeric, cinnamon and red-pepper flakes in a large bowl, then whisk to combine. Add the chicken, and toss well to coat. Cover, and store in refrigerator for at least 1 hour and up to 12 hours.
  2. When ready to cook, preheat oven to 425, preferably on convection roast. Line a rimmed sheet pan with parchment paper.
  3. Add the quartered onion to the chicken and marinade, and toss once to combine.
  4. Remove the chicken and onion from the marinade, and place on the pan, spreading everything evenly across it.
  5. Put the chicken in the oven, and roast until it is browned, crisp at the edges and cooked through, about 30 on convection roast, or up to 40 minutes in a standard oven.
  6. Remove from the oven, allow to rest 2 minutes, then slice into bits. (To make the chicken even more crisp, set a large pan over high heat, add a tablespoon of olive oil to the pan, then the sliced chicken, and sauté until everything curls tight in the heat.)
  7. Scatter the parsley over the top and serve with tomatoes, cucumbers, pita or flatbread, white sauce, hot sauce, olives, fried eggplant, feta, rice — really anything you desire.

One Year Ago:

Two Years Ago:

Blueberry Cornmeal Cake

There is still time! Fresh blueberries are still available!! I regret not posting this wonderful cake sooner- my apologies…. I first read about this blueberry cornmeal cake on Sue’s blog, Birgerbird. She described it as one of the best desserts she had ever tasted, and I know that she has tasted some delicious desserts! ;) I have had it on my “to make” list ever since. It lived up to my expectations. My family and I devoured it. Mmmmm…. We ate this delicious rustic cake for dessert but it would also be wonderful for a special breakfast. It’s not overly sweet and has a fabulous crumb from the cornmeal. Berries and corn are a wonderful match.

This recipe was adapted from Huckleberry: Stories, Secrets, and Recipes From our Kitchen by Zoe Nathan with Josh Loeband and Laurel Almerinda. I weighed the ingredients when possible which I have found not only ensures a better result but also decreases the preparation time. I modified the recipe to use a 9-inch springform pan, and substituted sour cream for the plain yogurt in the batter.

The authors recommend making this cake with gooseberries- I have to remember that when I receive my CSA gooseberries next season! Strawberries can be used as well. This cake can also be modified for the holidays by adding the zest of one orange, cranberries, and both brown and white sugar. Nice!!

Yield: Makes one 9-inch cake

  • 195 g (3/4 cup plus 1 1 /2 T) unsalted butter, cubed, at room temperature
  • 190 g (3/4 cup plus 3 T) granulated sugar, plus 2 T for sprinkling the top of the cake
  • 1 1/2 tsp coarse salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 4 1/2 T canola oil
  • 3 T maple syrup
  • 1 T vanilla extract
  • 200 g (1 1/2 cups) all-purpose flour
  • 120 g (3/4 cup) cornmeal
  • 2 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1 cup plus 2 T (270 ml) whole plain yogurt or sour cream
  • 130 g (1/2 cup plus 1 T) whole milk ricotta
  • 150 g (1 cup) fresh blueberries

  1. Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees, preferably on convection.
  2. Line and grease (I used cooking oil spray) a 9-inch round springform pan of a 10-inch round cake pan.
  3. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and 190 g granulated sugar, and salt on medium-high, until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes.
  4. Incorporate eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Be sure to scrape the sides of the bowl well.
  5. With the mixer on low-speed, pour in the canola oil, maple syrup, and vanilla.
  6. Pause mixing and add the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, yogurt, and ricotta. Mix cautiously, just until incorporated. Do not over mix!
  7. Scoop the batter into the prepared pan. Top with the blueberries and sprinkle with the remaining 2 T granulated sugar.
  8. Bake for 50 minutes in a convection oven, or up to 1 hour 10 minutes in a standard oven, or until a cake tester comes out clean. Do not over bake! (I am obsessed with not over baking…)
  9. Allow to cool 15 minutes in the pan.
  10. If using a springform pan, release the sides of the pan and remove. (safer & easier!!) If using a cake pan, place a flat plate on top of the cake and pan. Carefully invert the cake onto the plate by flipping both upside down. Then lift the pan off the cake. Gently pull the parchment from every nook and cranny of the cake, being careful not to break the cake. Rest your serving plate on the bottom of the cake and turn the cake right-side up onto the plate.

Note: This cake is best served the day it’s made but keeps, tightly wrapped, at room temperature, for up to 2 days.

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