White Borscht

Before I was introduced to this recipe, I thought that borscht was always a deep red, beet-based soup. I now know that borscht means “sour.” The sour tang in this soup comes from soaking sourdough bread in the broth, puréeing it, and incorporating it into the finished soup, along with crème fraiche which is stirred in just prior to serving.

I made my first homemade borscht (the beet-based version) for Christmas Eve, and my husband purchased pierogies at a Polish store for the same meal. Luckily, I saw this recipe and he was also able to buy house-made garlic kielbasa for this soup. The quality of the kielbasa is very important because it is used to create the broth for the base of this soup.

This recipe is from The New York Times, contributed by Gabrielle Hamilton.  I followed the recipe closely, but may decrease the amount of butter next time- I’m not sure it was necessary! (but it was quite delicious 😉 ) It was a creamy, indulgent, and delicious upgrade of potato-leek soup. Fabulous cold-weather comfort food.

Yield: 5 quarts, Serves 10 to 12

  • 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 pounds full horseshoe link of high-quality smoked kielbasa
  • 5 fresh bay leaves
  • 3 pounds leeks (6 long, lively leeks)
  • 3 pounds russet potatoes (about 4)
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks)
  • 1 large yellow onion, small-diced (about 2 cups)
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 (4-ounce) hunk of dense, very sour sourdough bread, crusts removed
  • 1 full tablespoon finely ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup crème fraîche
  • 1 bunch fresh dill, woody stems removed, fronds minced

About Josette@thebrookcook

I live in Stony Brook, New York on Long Island. I love garlic and baking. My hobby (and love) is to try new recipes. My favorite recipe resources include The New York Times, Food and Wine, Bon Appetit, and Martha Stewart Living. Enjoy!

13 responses to “White Borscht

  1. Interesting recipe, almost a fancified combination of Russian Turya that starts with soaking tye bread in vodka (what else would you expect, right?) and Sbornaya Solyanka where the sour effect is achieved by adding chopped pickles. Crème fraîche is the fancy touch.

  2. Your soups are so intriguing. I feel like a stalker. 👀🍃

  3. Very interesting. And not borscht. Although I get what it means… Really lovely. And I just love kielbasa! Thanks!

  4. Mom

    Interesting recipe. Will try to make it 👍

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,312 other followers

Recipe Categories

my foodgawker gallery
my photos on tastespotting

Top Posts & Pages

Churro Cupcakes with Cinnamon Cream Cheese Frosting
Chicken Stew with Biscuits
Ravneet Gill's Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies
Bread Machine Brioche
Crusty Parmesan Roast Chicken with Lemon & Rosemary
Warm Lentil & Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower Salad
Asparagus Frittata with Burrata & Herb Pesto
One-Pan Shrimp Scampi with Orzo
Ottolenghi's Zucchini "Baba Ghanoush"
Ottolenghi's Baked Rice
Foodista Food Blog of the Day Badge
%d bloggers like this: