Shrimp in Yellow Curry

I have difficulty getting together the energy to cook after a long day at the beach. Life is rough! 😉 I’m always looking for new fast and fabulous meals to try.

This is a bright, flavor-packed, quick, and delicious weeknight dish. Perfect after a long day outside. It could be prepared any time of year as well.

The recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Mark Bittman. I modified the proportions, used Maharajah curry, and incorporated spinach and a red bell pepper into the dish. We ate it over brown Basmati rice. Wonderful!

Yield: Serves 4 to 6
  • 2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
  • 1 yellow onion, minced
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic (I used 7 cloves)
  • 1 tablespoon minced galangal or ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced hot chili, or crushed red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder, or to taste (I used Penzeys Maharajah curry)
  • 13.5 oz fresh or canned coconut milk
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into slices
  • 6 oz baby spinach
  • 1 ½ to 2 pounds medium-to-large shrimp, peeled with tails intact
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons fish sauce, or to taste
  • ¼ cup minced cilantro or mint leaves
  • brown Basmati rice, for serving (I used 1 1/2 cups rice to 3 cups stock)
  • naan, for serving, optional
  1. Place the oil in a large, deep skillet and turn the heat to medium. (I used enameled cast iron.)
  2. Add the onion, garlic, ginger, and chilies and cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables are tender and the mixture pasty.
  3. Add red pepper slices and sauté until starting to soften.
  4. Add the curry and cook, stirring, another minute.
  5. Add the coconut milk and raise the heat to medium-high. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is nearly dry.
  6. Add the shrimp and spinach, a few pinches of salt and a little black pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until the shrimp release their liquid (the mixture will become quite moist again) and turn pink, and the spinach is wilted.
  7. Add 1 tablespoon of fish sauce, stir, then taste and add the rest if necessary.
  8. Garnish with cilantro and serve with rice.

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Thai-Style Stir-Fried Rice Noodles with Chicken & Bok Choy

I receive a LOT of baby bok choy in my CSA share. Every time my husband spots it, he requests his favorite Thai dish, Pad See Ew. I do have a favorite version that I typically prepare, but, by chance I received a new recipe (email 😉 ) for his special dish when I received my recent bounty of bok choy.

The goal of this recipe was to recreate a high-heat wok cooked dish on a stove top by altering the stir fry technique. By cooking the ingredients in batches and combining all of the ingredients just prior to serving, the high-heat char typical of this dish was achieved. This version was indeed the closest I’ve come to reproducing my husband’s favorite take out dish.

This recipe was adapted from Cook’s Illustrated. I used baby bok choy instead of broccolini, chicken thighs instead of breasts, Thai chiles instead of serrano, and fresh rice noodles. I reduced the oil and doubled the recipe as well. Great!

Yield: Serves 8

For the Chile-Vinegar:

  • 1/3 cup white vinegar
  • 2 Thai chiles or 1 serrano chile, stemmed and sliced into thin rings

For the Stir-Fry:

  • 5 boneless, skinless chicken thighs, trimmed and cut against grain into ¼-inch thick slices
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 24 oz fresh wide rice noodles (can substitute 16 oz 1/4-inch wide dried rice noodles)
  • 5-6 T vegetable oil (I used sunflower seed oil)
  • 1/2 cup oyster sauce
  • 3 T soy sauce
  • 4 T packed dark brown sugar
  • 2 T white vinegar
  • 2 tsp molasses
  • 2 tsp fish sauce
  • 8 garlic cloves, sliced thin
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 pounds baby bok choy (about 10), sliced into 1/2-inch pieces, separated into leaves and stems (broccolini or broccoli are good substitutes)
  • additional greens, if desired (I added 1/2 head of my CSA Sugarloaf Chicory as well)

For the Chile Vinegar:

  1. Combine vinegar and serrano in bowl. Let stand at room temperature for at least 15 minutes.

For the Stir Fry:

  1. Combine chicken with 4 tablespoons water and baking soda in bowl. Let sit at room temperature for 15 minutes. Rinse chicken in cold water and drain well.
  2. If using fresh rice noodles: Place noodles in very hot tap water until they can be separated into large pieces. (If using dried rice noodles: Bring 6 cups water to boil. Place noodles in large bowl. Pour boiling water over noodles. Stir, then soak until noodles are almost tender, about 8 minutes, stirring once halfway through soak. Drain and rinse with cold water. Drain well and toss with 2 teaspoons oil.)
  3. Whisk oyster sauce, soy sauce, sugar, vinegar, molasses, and fish sauce together in bowl.
  4. Heat 1 T oil and garlic in 12-inch (nonstick) skillet over high heat, stirring occasionally, until garlic is deep golden brown, about minute.
  5. Add chicken and 4 tablespoons sauce mixture, toss to coat, and spread chicken into even layer. Cook, without stirring, until chicken begins to brown, 1 to 1½ minutes.
  6. Using tongs, flip chicken and cook, without stirring, until second side begins to brown, 1 to 1½ minutes.
  7. Push chicken to 1 side of skillet. Add 1 T oil to cleared side of skillet.
  8. Add eggs to clearing. Using rubber spatula, stir eggs gently and cook until set but still wet. Stir eggs into chicken and continue to cook, breaking up large pieces of egg, until eggs are fully cooked, 30 to 60 seconds. Transfer chicken mixture to bowl.
  9. Heat 1 T oil in now-empty skillet until smoking. Add bok choy stems and cook for 1 minute, stirring. Add the remaining bok choy leaves and 4 tablespoons sauce and toss to coat.
  10. Cover skillet and cook for about 1 to 2 minutes, stirring once halfway through cooking.
  11. Remove lid and continue to cook until broccolini is crisp and very brown in spots, 2 to 3 minutes, stirring once halfway through cooking. Transfer broccolini to bowl with chicken mixture.
  12. Sauce any additional greens in the remaining cooking liquid, if desired.
  13. Heat 1 T oil in now-empty skillet until smoking. Add half of noodles and 4 tablespoons sauce and toss to coat. Cook until noodles are starting to brown in spots, about 2 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking. Transfer noodles to bowl with chicken mixture.
  14. Repeat with remaining 1 T oil, noodles, and sauce. When second batch of noodles is cooked, add contents of bowl back to skillet and toss to combine. Cook, without stirring, until everything is warmed through, 1 to 1½ minutes.
  15. Transfer to a serving dish and serve immediately, passing chile vinegar separately.

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I’m sharing my special stir fry at Angie’s Fiesta Friday #146, co-hosted by Antonia @Zoale and Petra @Food Eat Love. Enjoy! 🙂

Thai One-Pot

I made this quick one-pot dish so that my son could gobble it up before his swim practice. After practice, he used my husband’s phone to text me (repeatedly), “I’m starving! I need more ONE POT!!” He absolutely loved it. Needless to say, he ate all of the leftovers. 🙂

This recipe was adapted from Food and Wine. I lightened the recipe by using ground turkey instead of ground pork. I also used arborio rice. My serving had additional fresh lime juice squeezed all over the top. Tasty!

Yield: Serves 4

  • 1 tablespoon canola or sunflower oil
  • 1 green bell pepper, cut into 1/4-inch strips
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into 1/4-inch strips
  • 1/4 pound shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, caps cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 1/4 pounds lean ground pork or turkey
  • 3/4 cup short-grain rice (I used arborio rice)
  • 2 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 4 scallions including green tops, chopped, plus more for garnish
  • radishes, cut into thin slices, to taste, for garnish
  • 5 tablespoons chopped cilantro or fresh parsley, plus more for garnish
  • juice from about 1 lime, plus lime wedges for garnish
  1. In a large frying pan, heat the oil over moderately high heat. (I used a 4-quart covered pan.)
  2. Add the bell peppers, shiitakes, and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Remove.
  3. Add the ground meat to the pan and cook, stirring, until it is no longer pink, about 3 minutes. Spoon off the fat from the pan, if using pork. Season with 1/4 tsp of salt and freshly ground pepper.
  4. Stir in the bell peppers and shiitakes, the rice, broth, soy sauce, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and the cayenne.
  5. Bring to a simmer. Cover. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, without removing the lid, until the rice is just done, about 20 minutes.
  6. Remove the pot from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes.
  7. Stir in the scallions, cilantro, and lime juice.
  8. Garnish with additional lime wedges, radishes, cilantro, and scallion slices, as desired. Serve.

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Curry Noodles with Shrimp & Coconut

I lucked out when I chose this recipe to serve to my brother. As I prepared it, he filled me in on his latest Asian noodle obsession- and all of the fabulous ramen noodle hot spots in Brooklyn and NYC. Fun! Thankfully, this dish was equally amazing-  I don’t like to be outdone… 😉

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by David Tanis. Tanis also suggests substituting chicken, tofu, or vegetables for the shrimp, if desired. A perfect summer meal. Quick, fresh, and tasty!!

  • 12 to 14 ounces rice noodles (vermicelli)
  • ½ teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon cumin seeds
  • ½ teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 6 allspice berries
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced, about 2 cups
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped lemongrass
  • ½ teaspoon grated garlic
  • 2 teaspoons grated ginger
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 ½ teaspoons turmeric
  • â…› teaspoon cayenne
  • Zest and juice of 1 lime
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • ½ cup slivered scallions
  • cilantro, basil and mint leaves, for garnish
  1. Cook rice noodles according to package directions, then drain and rinse well with cool water. Set aside. (I boiled a pot of water, removed it from the heat and soaked the vermicelli for about 10 minutes.) Keep a pot of boiling water on stove for reheating noodles later.
  2. Toast coriander seeds, cumin seeds, fennel seeds and allspice berries in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, then grind in a spice mill or with a mortar and pestle.
  3. Put coconut oil in a wide skillet (use a skillet that has a lid- for later) over medium heat. Add onions and cook until softened, about 5 to 8 minutes.
  4. Add lemongrass, garlic and ginger to softened onions and cook for 2 minutes more.
  5. Season with salt and pepper, then add ground coriander, cumin, fennel and allspice. Add turmeric, cayenne, lime zest and juice, fish sauce and coconut milk. Simmer gently for 5 minutes.
  6. Season shrimp and cherry tomatoes with salt. Add to pan and cover until shrimp are cooked, 3 to 4 minutes.
  7. Dip noodles briefly in hot water to reheat, then drain and divide among bowls.
  8. Spoon shrimp, tomatoes and sauce over each serving.
  9. Sprinkle with scallions and garnish with cilantro, basil and mint leaves.

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Caramel Chicken

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This chicken dish is a terrific weeknight meal. I am such a sauce person and I loved this salty-sweet sauce- as well as the pop of color (and zing) from the scallions. We ate it with white rice and roasted broccoli. This recipe was adapted from Bon Appetit.

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 10 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • Kosher salt
  • 8 garlic cloves, peeled, sliced
  • ⅓ cup (packed) light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup (or more) unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 slices ¼”-thick slices peeled ginger
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • ¼ cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Cooked white rice (for serving)
  1. Heat oil in a large wide heavy pot over medium-high heat. Season chicken with salt and, working in 2 batches, cook until golden brown and crisp, 3-4 minutes per side; transfer to a plate. Add garlic to pot and cook, stirring often, until golden, about 2 minutes; transfer to plate with chicken. Pour off fat from pot.
  2. Return pot to medium-high heat and add ½ cup water, scraping up browned bits. Add brown sugar; stir to dissolve, then cook, stirring, until mixture thickens and turns a deep amber color, about 4 minutes. Carefully add vinegar (it may bubble up; sugar will crystallize); stir to dissolve sugar.
  3. Add ginger, broth, and soy sauce, then add chicken, skin side up, and garlic. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer gently until chicken is cooked through, about 10-15 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate.
  4. Bring cooking liquid to a boil and cook until thick enough to coat a spoon, about 10 minutes. Return chicken to pot; turn to coat. Top with scallions and serve with rice.

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One Year Ago:

Soba Noodles with Shiitake Mushrooms & Bok Choy

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This is an Asian inspired noodle dish adapted from one of my favorite cookbooks, Field of Greens: New Vegetarian Recipes from the Celebrated Greens Restaurant by Annie Somerville. It is so “out of the box” for me! I don’t make a lot of Asian food…. but we do eat a lot of pasta. 🙂 I first made this dish when I received baby bok choy in my CSA box and didn’t know what to do with it. Now, I’m hooked on this recipe. It has so many wonderful fresh flavors- bok choy, shiitakes, fresh ginger, cilantro, scallions- not to mention the flavor from the peanut and sesame oils. It also has a spicy kick from the jalapeño. Super tasty.

Serves 2 to 4

  • 1/4 pound fresh shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/2 large or 2-3 small heads of bok choy
  • salt
  • 6 ounces thin dried buckwheat or soba noodles
  • 2 T peanut oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2/3 T grated fresh ginger
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded, cut in half lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 1-2 scallions, thinly sliced on a diagonal
  • 1 T dark sesame oil
  • 2 T mirin (sweet cooking sake)
  • 2 T light soy sauce
  • 2 T coarsely chopped cilantro
  • 1 tsp sesame seed, toasted, optional
  1. Set a large pot of water on the stove to boil.
  2. Remove the mushroom stems and cut the caps into 1/2-inch slices. (The stems can be saved for stock.)
  3. For small heads of bok choy, slice the stem lengthwise, leaving leaf and stem together. For a large head, slice the stems diagonally, 3/4-inch thick, and slice the leaves into 2-inch wide ribbons.
  4. When the water boils, add 1 teaspoon of salt. Add the noodles and cook as directed on the package, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  5. While the pasta is cooking, heat the peanut oil in a large sauté pan; add the shiitake mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Sauté over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes, then add the garlic, ginger, chilies, and bok choy and sauté for 2 minutes.
  6. Drain the pasta in a colander when it is just tender. Reduce the heat under the sauté pan and add the scallion, sesame oil, mirin, and soy sauce. Quickly add the noodles, taking care not to overcook the bok choy.
  7. Remove from the heat, toss the noodles with the vegetables and cilantro, and season with salt to taste, if necessary. Sprinkle with the sesame seed, if using.

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Chicken Teriyaki Plate

FW Teriyaki Chicken

When I get my Food and Wine magazine, I find a recipe that interests me and then cross check to see if it has a “staff favorite” label– I don’t remember being disappointed.  This recipe is a staff favorite. The write-up was interesting:

“Roy Choi’s excellent version of the clichéd dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda. He uses it as a substitute for sugar. ‘Asian cooking folklore says that adding soda to a marinade will help tenderize meat and poultry,’ says Choi. ‘As a chef, I know it probably does nothing. But because I want to carry on historical cooking traditions, I continue to use sodas in my marinades.'”

I substituted boneless, skinless chicken thighs, Hansen’s mandarin lime natural cane soda from Trader Joes’s, and used a vidalia onion.  I keep fresh ginger root wrapped tightly in plastic wrap in my freezer- it is always on hand and is easy to grate.

  • 1 cup lemon-lime soda
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3/4 cup rice vinegar
  • 1 medium onion—1/2 grated, 1/2 thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 4 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 pounds boneless chicken thighs with skin
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • Steamed white rice and hot sauce, for serving
  1. In a bowl, mix the soda, soy sauce, vinegar, grated onion, ginger, garlic and sugar. Add the chicken; turn to coat. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour or refrigerate overnight.
  2. Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat very dry. Reserve 1 cup of the marinade. Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of the oil in a large, deep skillet. Add the chicken skin side down and cook over moderately high heat, turning once, until browned and cooked through, 7 to 8 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a plate.
  3. Wipe out the skillet and heat the remaining 1 1/2 tablespoons of oil. Add the sliced onion and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until browned, 5 minutes. Add the reserved 1 cup of marinade; boil until slightly reduced, 2 minutes. Swirl in the butter and add the cilantro. Return the chicken and any juices to the skillet and cook until heated through, 1 minute. Serve with steamed rice and hot sauce.

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