Strawberry-Basil Martini

This was the first thing we made with our freshly picked Long Island strawberries. In fact, I enjoyed it the day that we picked them. 🙂 It was jammy and absolutely fabulous.

The recipe was adapted from Food and Wine, contributed by José Zepeda. The sweetness can be easily adjusted by decreasing the amount of agave or simple syrup. It was a warm evening, so we served it over ice. Perfect.

Yield: 1 drink

  1. In a cocktail shaker, muddle the strawberries with the basil leaves and simple syrup or agave nectar.
  2. Add ice and the remaining ingredients and shake well.
  3. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with strawberry slices and basil, as desired.

Spicy-Sweet Sambal Pork Noodles

This tasty and quick dish is listed as one of Bon AppĂ©tit’s Most Popular Recipes of 2019. It’s a great list! 🙂 The dish is inspired by pad kee mao, known as drunken noodles.

I used fresh noodles from an Asian grocery that were the most similar to fresh ramen noodles. This dish was adapted from Bon Appétit, contributed by Chris Morocco. I modified the proportions and method. Great.

Yield: Serves 6 to 8

  • 2.5 T extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 1/2 lbs ground pork, divided
  • 1 2 1/2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled, cut into thin matchsticks or finely chopped
  • 10 large garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 1/2 T granulated sugar
  • 2 1/2 T tomato paste
  • 2 sprigs basil, plus more for serving
  • 6 T hot chili paste (I used sambal oelek)
  • 5 T soy sauce
  • 5 T unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 lbs fresh ramen noodles or 16 to 20oz dried spaghetti
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 1/2 T unsalted butter

  1. Heat oil in a large wide heavy pot over medium-high. (I used a large enameled cast iron Dutch oven.)
  2. Add half of pork to pot, breaking apart into 6–8 large chunks with a wooden spoon. Cook, undisturbed, until well browned underneath, about 5 minutes. Turn pieces and continue to cook, turning occasionally, until pork is browned on 2–3 sides, about 5 minutes longer.
  3. Add ginger, garlic, sugar, and remaining pork to pot and cook, breaking up pork into small clumps, until meat is nearly cooked through, about 5 minutes longer.
  4. Add tomato paste and 2 basil sprigs. Cook, stirring occasionally, until paste darkens, about 2 minutes.
  5. Add chili paste, soy sauce, vinegar, and 2 1/2 cups water. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to low, and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until sauce is slightly thickened and flavors have melded, 30–45 minutes.
  6. Cook noodles in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until 1 minute short of al dente. Reserve 1 cup of pasta water. (I cooked 1 pound of noodles at a time for 1 minute each, removing the first batch with a bamboo strainer.)
  7. Add to cooked noodles to the pot with sauce along with butter and a splash of pasta cooking liquid. Simmer, tossing occasionally, until sauce begins to cling to noodles, about 1 minute. Pluck out basil sprigs.
  8. Adjust consistency with additional pasta water, as desired.
  9. Divide noodles among plates. Top with torn basil.

Cream of Fresh Pea Soup

I have one more green soup to share. This bright green soup screams “springtime” to me but it can be a wonderful summertime soup because it is also delicious served chilled. It is a classic soup in my house- I have made it for years using both fresh or frozen peas.

The fresh herbs provide the bright flavor in the finished soup. I have always incorporated fresh dill but I can imagine that it would also be delicious with basil or a combination of fresh herbs.

This recipe is adapted from Mollie Katzen’s The Enchanted Broccoli Forest. Fast, healthy, and delicious.

Yield: 5 to 6 servings

  • 1 T unsalted butter
  • 1 large yellow onion, minced
  • 1/2 tsp coarse salt
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetable or chicken stock, or water
  • 4 cups peas, fresh (about 20 oz) or frozen
  • 1 cup milk (low-fat or soy okay)
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 T minced fresh dill, mint, basil, tarragon, parsley, and/or chives
  1. Melt the butter in a soup pot or Dutch oven. Add onion and salt, and cook over medium heat until the onion is soft, 8 to 10 minutes.
  2. Add the stock/water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover, and simmer for about 10 minutes.
  3. Add the peas, cover again, and remove from the heat. Let stand for 5 minutes, or until the peas are tender.
  4. Purée the soup with the milk using an immersion blender, food processor, or blender, then return the purée to the pot.
  5. Reheat the soup very gently. Add the minced fresh herbs just prior to serving.

Note: This soup also tastes wonderful served at room temperature or chilled.

Cucumber-Tomato Salad with Seared Halloumi & Sourdough Croutons

This is a great dish to make with wonderful September tomatoes. I used a blend of my CSA tomatoes with grape as well as Campari tomatoes. It may possibly be my daughter’s (and even my husband’s!) dream salad- loaded with tomatoes, cucumbers, sourdough and fried cheese?!?! It was well received. 🙂

The recipe was inspired by a Greek horiatiki salad and is also similar to an Italian panzanella. Incorporating halloumi cheese makes it hearty enough to serve as a vegetarian main course. This recipe is from The New York Times, contributed by Julia Moskin.

Yield: 6 to 8 as an appetizer or side, 4 to 6 as a main course

For the Croutons:

  • 1 pound slightly stale sourdough or country bread, thickly sliced
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt

For the Salad:

  • 4 to 5 cups cucumber chunks, preferably thin-skinned, such as Kirby or Persian
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 to 3 pounds cherry tomatoes, halved, or ripe tomatoes, cored and cut into chunks (I used a blend of orange cherry, grape, and Campari tomatoes)
  • 8 to 12 ounces halloumi cheese
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup excellent quality extra-virgin olive oil, plus more as needed
  • 2 T thinly sliced red onion or scallions, plus more to taste
  • 2 to 3 T coarsely chopped fresh mint or basil
  • 2 T red wine vinegar, plus more as needed

To Make the Croutons:

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Cut each slice of bread into 1-inch-wide strips. Tear each strip into 1-inch pieces, removing the crust as you go if it is very thick.
  3. Transfer to a large rimmed baking sheet (or use 2 sheets, if necessary to prevent crowding). Drizzle with olive oil and toss until evenly coated.
  4. Bake until golden brown and crunchy on the outside, 10 to 20 minutes, rotating the baking sheet and turning the croutons halfway through so they brown evenly, and checking them every few minutes. (I baked mine for 12 minutes on convection.)
  5. Taste and adjust the seasoning with a light sprinkling of salt, if needed. Let cool on the baking sheet.

To Make the Salad:

  1. In a colander in the sink, toss the cucumbers with about 1/2 teaspoon salt. Place a bag of ice cubes or an ice pack on top to chill and firm the cucumbers. Let drain while you prepare the other ingredients.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes with about 1/2 teaspoon salt. Toss and set aside while you prepare the other ingredients.
  3. Slice the halloumi about 1/4-inch thick, then cut into bite-size strips.
  4. Smash and peel the garlic cloves and combine with 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil in a measuring cup to steep.
  5. Pour off excess liquid from the bowl holding the tomatoes. Add drained cucumbers, red onion or scallions, fresh herbs and 2 tablespoons vinegar to tomatoes and toss well.
  6. Remove and discard the garlic cloves from the extra-virgin olive oil, add the oil to tomatoes and mix well. (If desired, the salad can be made up until this point and refrigerated for 30 minutes to 1 hour. Drain off excess liquid in the bottom of the bowl before proceeding.)
  7. When ready to serve, add about half the croutons to the salad and toss so they can absorb the liquid.
  8. Taste and adjust the seasonings with salt, pepper, extra-virgin olive oil and vinegar.
  9. Cook the halloumi: Line a plate with paper towels and lightly coat a nonstick skillet with extra-virgin olive oil. Heat oil over medium-high until rippling. Working in batches, cook the halloumi strips on both sides until golden-brown and crusty, about 1 minute per side. Remove to the plate to drain.
  10. Taste and add more croutons to salad as desired. (If there are too many, the salad will be starchy; too few, and it will be wet.)
  11. At the last minute, toss in the halloumi, mix gently and serve immediately. (If desired, transfer to a clean bowl or platter for serving.)

Orecchiette with Swiss Chard, Basil, & Burrata

This wonderful dish was lemony and rich with burrata. I must confess that the “burrata hack” I shared in my last post was not a true match to the real thing. :/

This recipe was adapted from Bringing it Home: Favorite Recipes from a Life of Adventurous Eating by Gail Simmons with Mindy Fox. I increased the garlic and decreased (gasp!) the burrata.

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

  • Kosher salt
  • 1 pound dried orecchiette (can substitute fusilli, cavatelli, gemelli, or conchiglie)
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 T unsalted butter
  • 4 large garlic cloves, very thinly sliced
  • 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 pound (about 1 large or 2 small bunches) Swiss chard, leaves sliced into 2-inch pieces, ribs and stems thinly sliced crosswise
  • freshly grated zest from 3-4 lemons
  • 3 T fresh lemon juice
  • 3 T freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  • 8 oz burrata cheese
  • 1/2 cup torn or sliced basil leaves
  • coarsely ground black pepper
  1. In a large saucepan of well-salted boiling water, cook the pasta until al dente.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil and butter over medium heat until the butter is melted.
  3. Add the garlic, pepper flakes, and 3/4 tsp salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the garlic is fragrant and golden, 2 to 3 minutes.
  4. Add half of the chard leaves and stems and continue cooking, stirring frequently, until the greens are wilted.
  5. Add the remaining chard leaves and stems, the lemon zest, and the lemon juice. Cook, stirring, until all of the chard is just wilted. Remove the pan from the heat.
  6. Reserving 1 cup of the cooking water, drain the pasta. Return the pasta to the pot.
  7. Add the chard to the pasta along with the reserved pasta water; cook over medium heat, stirring, for 30 seconds.
  8. Adjust the seasoning, to taste.
  9. Place in a serving dish and stir in the Parmesan cheese.
  10. Cut the burrata into chunks.
  11. Top the pasta with the burrata and sprinkle with the basil leaves. Additional lemon zest can be added as well, if desired. Serve.

Basil Chicken Saltimbocca with Marinated Tomatoes & Mozzarella

We gobbled up the original version of this classic Italian dish when it was published in Bon Appétit. I had to try this summery version of the same dish. It was absolutely incredible.

This recipe was adapted from Half Baked Harvest.com. I used boneless, skinless chicken thighs instead of chicken breasts, increased the amount of garlic, and substituted ciliegine mozzarella balls for the burrata. It is an amazing adaptation of the original recipe.

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

  • 6 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 6 cloves garlic, grated
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup fresh basil, approximately, divided
  • 10 thin slices prosciutto
  • 3 large eggs, beaten
  • 2 cups Panko bread crumbs
  • 2 cups cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
  • 3 T extra virgin olive oil, plus more for cooking
  • 2 T balsamic vinegar
  • 2 T fresh thyme leaves, optional
  • zest of 1 lemon, optional
  • 4 oz ciliegine mozzarella balls or 3 balls burrata cheese, torn
  1. Working one at a time, place the chicken thighs between 2 sheets of plastic wrap. Pound to achieve even thickness.
  2. Place the eggs and Panko in separate shallow bowls. (I used glass pie dishes.)
  3. Rub the chicken with garlic (1 clove per chicken thigh) and season with salt and pepper.
  4. One at a time, press 2 basil leaves on top of each chicken thigh.
  5. Wrap 2 pieces (1 1/2 pieces if small) of prosciutto around each cutlet to secure the basil.
  6. Dredge both sides of the chicken through the egg and then through the Panko, pressing gently to adhere. Place the chicken on a plate.
  7. Make the marinated tomatoes: In a bowl, toss together the tomatoes, 3 tablespoons olive oil, the balsamic vinegar, 1/2 cup fresh basil (chiffonade), and a pinch of salt, as well as the thyme and lemon zest, if using. (I omitted the thyme and lemon zest.) Add the cheese, if using ciliegine. Toss to combine. Set aside.
  8. Heat a few tablespoons of oil in a large skillet over medium-high.
  9. When the oil shimmers, add the chicken and cook until the bottom side is golden brown, about 3-4 minutes.
  10. Carefully flip the chicken and cook until golden brown on the other side, about 3-4 minutes.
  11. Transfer to a plate and lightly season with salt.
  12. Serve the chicken warm topped with the mozzarella/burrata and marinated tomatoes.

Zucchini Salad with Pecorino, Basil, & Almonds

This raw zucchini salad was lovely. I loved the contrasting texture from the crunchy almond topping. The dressing was also wonderfully bright and flavorful.

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Alexa Weibel. I used a mini food processor to quickly prepare the dressing. We ate this as a side with grilled chicken but it would also be perfect to serve as a light lunch.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

  • 3 T extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 small to medium shallot
  • 2 T capers, chopped, plus 2 teaspoons caper brine
  • zest of one lemon (about 1 tsp)
  • 1 T freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 medium zucchini or summer squash (6 to 7 ounces each), or a combination
  • 1/3 cup shaved Pecorino-Romano cheese
  • 1/4 cup torn fresh basil, plus more for garnish, if desired
  • 1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley, plus more for garnish, if desired
  • 1/3 cup roasted salted almonds, chopped
  1. In the bowl of a mini food processor, mince the shallot and garlic.
  2. Add the oil, capers, caper brine, lemon zest, and lemon juice. Pulse to combine.
  3. Season with salt and pepper, pulse again. Set aside. (Alternatively, the dressing can be made in a small bowl.)
  4. Trim the ends of the zucchini and cut each squash into 2-inch segments. Slice the segments lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slabs, then slice those slabs lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick batons. Add to a large bowl.
  5. Just before serving, season the zucchini with salt and pepper and toss to coat.
  6. Stir in the cheese, herbs and dressing and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  7. Sprinkle with the almonds. Garnish with additional herbs, if desired. Serve immediately.

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