Baked Risotto with Chicken Thighs & Winter Squash

I have one more butternut squash recipe to share. This creamy and hearty one-pot dish was an absolute crowd-pleaser. I used butternut squash, but this dish could also be prepared using Kabocha or acorn squash instead.

This recipe was adapted from Martha Stewart Living’s Everyday Food. I used butternut squash instead of Kabocha, substituted boneless, skinless chicken thighs for bone-in, used thyme instead of oregano, and increased the amount of garlic. I served the dish with roasted cauliflower.

Yield: Serves 6 to 8

  • 3-4 T vegetable oil, divided
  • 8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large white onion, diced medium
  • 4 cups of large chunks (about 1 1/4 pounds) butternut, Kabocha, or acorn squash
  • 4 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 sprigs of thyme or oregano
  • 1 1/2 cups Arborio rice
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken stock
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees, preferably on convection.
  2. In a large heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat 3 tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat. (I used an enameled cast iron pan.)
  3. Pat the chicken dry and season with salt and pepper.
  4. In batches, cook chicken, “skin side” down, until deep golden and fat is rendered, 6 to 7 minutes. Flip and cook 1 minute more. Transfer chicken to a plate.
  5. Reduce heat to medium and add remaining tablespoon oil, if needed, to pot. (I didn’t add additional oil and used the chicken drippings in the pot instead.)
  6. Add onion and squash and cook until onion is translucent, 8 minutes.
  7. Add garlic and thyme/oregano and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds.
  8. Add rice and cook, stirring, until opaque, 1 to 2 minutes.
  9. Add wine and cook, stirring, until completely evaporated, 1 to 2 minutes.
  10. Add broth, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper; stir to incorporate. Then return the chicken to the pot, “skin side up.”
  11. Bring to a boil; cover, transfer to oven, and cook until liquid is absorbed and rice is tender, 25 minutes.
  12. Let sit, covered, 10 minutes. Serve.

Kabocha Squash, Sausage, & Cornbread Gratin

I am in love with kabocha squash- it is just so creamy and sweet. This dish may be the ultimate autumn casserole. It was a little bit involved to prepare but the results were worth every minute.

This recipe was adapted from Bon Appetit, contributed by Claire Saffitz. I slightly modified the proportions and method. Fabulous!

4 to 6 servings
  • 1 small to medium kabocha squash
  • 7 large garlic cloves
  • 3 6-inch-long rosemary sprigs
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • Kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 bunch Tuscan kale (I used a 10 oz bag), ribs removed and torn into 1-2″ pieces (about 8 cups)
  • 2 medium shallots
  • 1 pound fresh pork sausage, such as sweet Italian (about 4 links)
  • 2 cups crumbled cornbread, from a 6×4 inch piece
  • 2 T unsalted butter
  • 1 T olive oil
  1. Bake cornbread. (I used Trader Joe’s Cornbread Mix.) Set aside to cool.
  2. Position a rack in center of oven; preheat to 400°, preferably on convection.
  3. Cut off stem end of kabocha squash and rest on cut side. Cut squash in half. Scoop out seeds and stringy innards with a spoon; discard. Cut squash into 1″-thick slices. Using your knife, slice off the tough peel and layer of light green flesh beneath.
  4. Smash the garlic cloves with the side of the knife and remove peel.
  5. Combine squash, garlic, rosemary sprigs, heavy cream, and ¼ cup water in a medium saucepan. Season generously with salt and pepper and bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat. Cover pot and reduce heat to low. Simmer until squash is tender and easily mashes when pressed with the back of a spoon, 20-25 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, grasp stem end of each kale leaf. Starting at stem, slide your other hand along length of leaf to strip leaves. Repeat with entire bunch; discard stems. Tear leaves into 1″–2″ pieces (you should have about 8 cups).
  7. Peel 2 shallots and thinly slice crosswise.
  8. Use the tip of your knife to prick the sausages all over in several places.
  9. Crumble cornbread into coarse crumbs (you should have about 2 cups).
  10. When squash is tender, remove saucepan from heat. Uncover and pluck out rosemary sprigs, leaving leaves inside pot. Transfer entire mixture to a medium bowl (reserve saucepan) and mash with the back of a spoon or a potato masher until no distinct pieces of squash remain. Season with salt and pepper.
  11. Wipe out pot with paper towels and heat over medium. Add butter and heat until melted. Add shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, about 4 minutes.
  12. Add kale to the pot, a couple of handfuls at a time, stirring to wilt between each batch, and cook until leaves are dark green and wilted, about 3 minutes; season with salt and pepper.
  13. Transfer to kale to the bowl with squash, then fold to incorporate.
  14. Heat the olive oil in the same saucepan over medium and add sausage. Cook, turning once, until browned on both sides (they won’t be cooked through), about 6 minutes. Transfer to cutting board and let cool for a few minutes (reserve saucepan again and do not pour out fat from sausages–you’re going to use it one more time).
  15. Meanwhile, using a rubber spatula, scrape squash and kale mixture into a shallow 2-qt. baking dish and smooth top. (I coated the baking dish with cooking oil spray.)
  16. Cut sausages crosswise into 2″ pieces and nestle into top of squash mixture, spacing evenly.
  17. Heat the drippings remaining in the saucepan over medium and add cornbread crumbs. Cook, stirring, just until crumbs are evenly coated in fat. Scatter cornbread crumbs over squash mixture; season with more salt and pepper.
  18. Bake gratin until crumbs are toasty and brown and sausages are cooked through (you can insert an instant-read thermometer into center of sausage to check if registers 140°, or just cut into one with a knife), about 15 minutes.
  19. Let cool 5–10 minutes before serving.

Butternut Squash Bread Soup (Panade de Butternut)

This dish could have fed an army. It was GIGANTIC.  I would describe it as French onion soup meets oozy casserole. Full-flavored, cheese-covered comfort food. The thinly sliced butternut squash and fresh herbs layered into the bread, caramelized onions, and cheese added a little bit of excitement as well as color and nutrition. 😉

This recipe was adapted from My Paris Kitchen by David Lebovitz. Lebovitz stated that this is one of those dishes that improves as it sits… thank goodness! We had lots of leftovers. 🙂 I added additional homemade stock to the leftovers, before reheating, just to make it a little bit soupier.

Yield: Serves 8 to 10

  • 3 T unsalted butter
  • 3 T olive oil
  • 4 large yellow onions, peeled and sliced
  • 8 cloves garlic, peeled (4 thinly sliced & 4 whole)
  • 2 T mixed fresh thyme and sage
  • 2-pound (900 g) loaf firm-textured sourdough bread, sliced
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 2 quarts (2 l) warm chicken or turkey stock, plus additional stock for serving, as desired
  • 2-pound butternut squash or other winter squash such as Kabocha, peeled, seeded and sliced into 1/8-inch slices
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups grated Comte, Gruyere, Jarlsberg, or Fontina cheese
  • 1/2 cup (1 1/2 oz /45 g) freshly grated Parmesan cheese (I used Parmigiano-Reggiano)

  1. Melt the butter with the olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. (I used an enameled cast iron Dutch oven.)
  2. Add the onions, 4 cloves of sliced garlic, and 1 teaspoon of the herbs. Cook for about 35 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are completely wilted and beginning to brown on the bottom and edges.
  3. While the onions are cooking, preheat the oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).
  4. Put the slices of bread on baking sheets in a single layer and toast in the oven, turning the slices over midway, until both sides are dry, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from the oven.
  5. When cool enough to handle, rub both sides of the bread with the whole garlic cloves.
  6. Slice the peeled and seeded squash into 1/8-inch slices. (I used a mandoline.)
  7. When the onions are done, pour in the wine, scraping the bottom of the pan to loosen up any of the flavorful brown bits. Cook for a minute or two, until the wine is absorbed.
  8. Add 2 cups of the stock to the onions and cook until the stock is mostly absorbed 10 to 15 minutes, and then add the rest of the stock and heat until the stock is hot. Remove from heat.
  9. To assemble the Panade, cover the bottom of a 3 to 4 quart (3-4 l), 3+inch (8 cm) deep, baking dish with a layer of bread, breaking any pieces so they fit in a single layer, but keeping them as large as possible.
  10. Ladle about half of the onions and some of the stock over the bread, and then cover with half of the squash slices. Season lightly with salt, pepper, and half of the remaining herbs.
  11. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup (40 g) of the Comte.
  12. Add a second layer of bread and ladle the rest of the onions and more stock over the bread. Cover with remaining squash slices. Season the squash with salt, pepper, and the remaining herbs.
  13. Sprinkle another 1/2 cup (40 g) of Comte over the squash layer.
  14. Cover the squash with a final layer of bread and then ladle the rest of the stock over the bread.
  15. Press down on the ingredients to encourage them to meld together.
  16. Top with remaining 1 cup (90 g) Comte, and the Parmesan.
  17. Cover the baking dish with aluminum foil and tighten it around the edges. Don’t press it down on the surface or some cheese may stick to the foil during baking.
  18. Set the baking dish on a parchment paper or foil-lined rimmed baking sheet to catch any spills.
  19. Bake for 45 minutes, uncover the Panade, and bake for another 30 minutes, or until it is very well browned and crisp on top.
  20. Let cool for about 15 minutes before serving. Spoon portions into shallow soup bowls, making sure each serving is topped with crusty topping.

I’m bringing my dinner-party ready comfort food to share at Angie’s Fiesta Friday #164 this week, hosted by Jhuls @The Not So Creative Cook. Enjoy!

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Squash & Pork Stir-Fry

I’m sure you’ve rushed around the grocery store thinking you’ve purchased the necessary ingredients to throw together a “quick” weeknight meal. Right? I thought that was the case for me… When  I started to prepare this dish, I realized that I had ground pork instead of pork sausage and butternut instead of kabocha squash. I’m blaming holiday stress and distraction. (Well, truth be told, the squash was a conscious substitution- no fabulous kabocha to be found.) :/

This recipe was adapted from Bon Appetit, contributed by Chris Morocco. I doubled the recipe, used ground pork instead of pork sausage (oops!), seasoned accordingly, butternut instead of kabocha squash, and cashews instead of peanuts. I also omitted the sugar. I roasted the squash instead of steaming and sautéing it. We let the dish stand alone, but it would also be wonderful accompanied by rice. Delicious!

Yield: 4 Servings

  • 1 medium butternut or kabocha squash, cut into 1-inch pieces, approximately 4 cups
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 pound (80 percent lean) ground pork
  • 1 tsp coarse salt, plus more for squash
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper, plus more for squash
  • dash or two of red pepper flakes, to taste
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 6 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1 large shallot, chopped
  • 2 serrano chiles, seeded and sliced
  • 1 T finely grated peeled ginger root
  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice (from 1 large lime)
  • 4 tsp fish sauce
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • salted, roasted peanuts or cashews and chopped cilantro, for serving, as desired
  1. Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees, preferably on convection roast.
  2. Toss squash with 1 T olive oil and season liberally with salt and pepper. Place squash on a parchment paper-lined rimmed baking sheet and roast in the oven until tender, about 25 minutes. Let cool slightly.
  3. Meanwhile, heat remaining 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet. Add pork, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper, red pepper flakes, oregano, thyme, and paprika; cook, breaking into large pieces and stirring occasionally, until browned and cooked through, about 5 minutes.
  4. Add garlic, shallot, chiles, and ginger and cook, stirring often, just until softened, about 2 minutes.
  5. Add roasted squash, lime juice, fish sauce, and scallions; toss to combine.
  6. Serve stir-fry topped with nuts and cilantro, as desired.

One Year Ago:

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Four Years Ago:

If you like this you may also like:

Kabocha Squash Saute with Bacon & Sage

I have a new favorite squash! KABOCHA. I wasn’t going to post this simple side dish- but then it was so amazing that I didn’t want to forget it!! 🙂

This recipe was adapted from Trader Joe’s. It would be an amazing holiday side dish.

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

  • 1 Kabocha Squash, seeded, peeled, and cubed
  • 4 slices thick-cut uncured apple smoked bacon, chopped
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced, about 1 1/2 cups
  • 6 fresh sage leaves, chiffonade, plus more for garnish
  • coarse salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup water or chicken stock
  • balsalmic glaze, for serving, optional
  1. Seed, peel, and dice the squash.
  2. Cook chopped bacon in a medium sauté pan (with a lid) until crispy. Remove bacon and oil (reserving about 1 1/2 T fat) to a paper towel-lined plate.
  3. Add onion and sauté for 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add cubed squash to the onions in the pan. Season with salt and pepper; cook, stirring occasionally for 12 minutes. Add water or stock to the pan to prevent sticking, if needed.
  5. Add 1/4 cup water or stock to the pan. Cover and steam for an additional 5 minutes, or until tender but still firm.
  6. Remove lid, stir in reserved bacon and sage.
  7. Remove from heat and dress with balsamic glaze, if desired.

One Year Ago:

If you like this you may also like:

Kabocha Squash Puree with Browned Butter & Sage

Last year, I saw kabocha squash recipes everywhere- after the season was over. When I saw this special squash in the store this year, I bought one without a plan- I didn’t want to miss out again…

We ate this wonderful side dish, adapted from a “staff-favorite” Food and Wine recipe contributed by Michael Tusk, with grilled chicken sausages! It wasn’t the best compliment- but was absolutely delicious anyway. 🙂 The squash was creamy and sweet and the browned butter added rich nuttiness. This dish would be a better match to an elegant meal. Next time! 🙂

Yield: Serves 6 as a side dish

IMG_0733

  • 1 kabocha squash (about 3 pounds each), halved and seeded
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 T unsalted butter
  • 6 sage leaves, plus more as desired for garnish
  • coarse salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • aged balsamic vinegar, for drizzling, optional
  1. Preheat the oven to 425° and line a roasting pan with parchment paper. (I used the convection roast setting.)
  2. Rub the inside of each squash half with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and press a sage leaf onto each one.
  3. Season the squash with salt and pepper and place cut side down in the roasting pan. (I used a 9×13-inch glass pyrex pan.)
  4. Add 1 cup of water to the pan. Cover with foil and roast for 1 hour, until tender.
  5. Let cool. Discard the sage and scoop the flesh into a bowl.
  6. In a small skillet, melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter.
  7. Add the remaining 4+ sage leaves and cook over moderate heat until the butter is lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Transfer the sage to a plate.
  8. Add the browned butter and lemon juice to the squash and mash to a puree.
  9. Season with salt and pepper.
  10. Transfer the squash to a bowl, drizzle with balsamic vinegar, if desired, and garnish with the fried sage leaves.

Make Ahead: The squash puree can be refrigerated overnight. Reheat in a microwave before garnishing.

One Year Ago:

Moroccan Butternut Squash Soup

IMG_7811

I have been desperate to use Harissa. I am not sure if that one ingredient made this soup so delicious…. but it was the best butternut squash soup I have ever made or eaten. The recipe calls for an aged goat cheese but the author also suggested using Gouda if the other was unavailable. I used a goat milk Gouda cheese (perfect!); the cheese gave the soup an amazing flavor but was not overpowering. This recipe was adapted from Food and Wine, contributed by Paula Wolfert. We ate it with popovers and green salad. YUM!

For the La Kama Spice Blend: (use extra on roasted vegetables)

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground white or freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cubeb pepper (optional)
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

For the Soup:

  • 1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Coarse salt
  • 2 pounds butternut, kabocha or calabaza squash—peeled, seeded and cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/2 cup crème fraîche or heavy cream
  • 1/4 pound aged goat cheese, shredded (I used goat milk Gouda)
  • Harissa
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  1. Make the Spice Blend: In a small bowl, combine all of the ingredients. Store in an airtight container.
  2. In a large, heavy pot, toss the onion with the olive oil and 1 teaspoon of salt. Cover and cook over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is very soft, about 10 minutes. Stir in the squash, cover with a round of parchment paper and the lid and cook for 20 minutes.
  3. Add the tomato paste, 1 teaspoon of the spice blend and the water to the pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the squash is tender, 20 minutes. Let cool.
  4. Working in batches, puree the soup in a blender (I use an immersion blender in the pot.); add the crème fraîche, three-fourths of the cheese and 1 teaspoon of harissa to the last batch. Return all of the soup to the pot and season with salt and black pepper. Serve the soup, passing the remaining cheese and more harissa at the table.

One Year Ago:

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