Broccoli & Egg Fried Rice

I am taking a break from bombarding everyone with sourdough recipes. I still have quite a few tasty ones to share! 😉

This vegetarian fried rice dish was fast, easy, crowd-pleasing comfort food. Making it in a large cast iron skillet was the perfect vessel to create just the right amount of crispy rice and caramelized vegetables. According to the original recipe, another secret to getting color on the rice was the inclusion of sugar.

The recipe was adapted from Bon Appétit, contributed by Kat Boytsova. I modified the proportions and substituted Basmati rice for sushi rice. It is a wonderful base recipe to incorporate any vegetables and/or protein with leftover rice in the fridge.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

  • 5 cups of broccoli florets and stems (pieces should be of similar size)
  • 1 large bunch scallions (I used 7)
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 1/4 tsp Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 T granulated sugar
  • 2 T soy sauce
  • 1 1/2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 4 large garlic cloves, grated
  • 6-7 T vegetable oil, divided
  • 4-5 cups cooked, day-old sushi rice (I used leftover brown and white Basmati rice)
  • 4 T toasted sesame oil
  • 3 T unseasoned rice vinegar

This fried rice comes together really quickly, so it’s important that all of your ingredients are prepped and ready to go before you start cooking.

To Prep:

  1. Place broccoli to a medium bowl.
  2. Trim scallions on both ends, then cut crosswise into 1″ pieces. Transfer to bowl with broccoli.
  3. Whisk eggs in another medium bowl to combine and season with 3/4 teaspoons of salt.
  4. Whisk sugar, soy sauce, and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt in a small bowl.
  5. Grate the ginger and garlic cloves into the bowl of sauce and give it another whisk.

To Cook:

  1. Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of vegetable oil in a large cast-iron skillet (or non-stick if you don’t have one)over medium-high until just beginning to smoke. (I used a 12-inch cast iron skillet.)
  2. Add broccoli and scallions, season with a good pinch of salt, and toss with a spatula to coat in oil. Cook, undisturbed, until well charred on one side, about 5 minutes. When we say “undisturbed,” we mean it! You need consistent, direct contact with the hot pan in order to get color on the veggies, so resist the urge to constantly fuss with them.
  3. Mix with spatula and continue to cook, tossing occasionally, until broccoli is crisp-tender and scallions are wilted, about 2 more minutes. Transfer veggies back to the bowl they came from.
  4. Heat remaining 5 tablespoons vegetable oil in skillet over medium-low.
  5. Add eggs and cook, stirring constantly with a rubber spatula, until large curds begin to form, about 30 seconds. The eggs will cook very quickly, so try to err on the side of runny and less-cooked because they can become spongy if overcooked.
  6. Add the rice and soy sauce mixture to eggs. Toss well to combine, then press down evenly into skillet. Cook, undisturbed, until rice is slightly crisped on one side, about 5 minutes. (Remember: undisturbed!)
  7. Return veggies to skillet and toss well to combine.
  8. Remove from heat, add sesame oil and rice vinegar, and toss once more. Serve.

Fried Rice with Kimchi, Bacon & Cabbage

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! I am planning on serving shepherd’s pie tonight, but, for those of you serving corned beef and cabbage, this quick dish will put any leftover cabbage to good use. 🙂

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Melissa Clark. We ate it drizzled with sriracha and additional soy sauce. I also served the leftovers with scrambled eggs instead of fried.

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

  • 5 tablespoons neutral oil, such as grapeseed or sunflower, plus more as needed (I used canola oil)
  • 3 slices thick-cut bacon, in 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 small bunch scallions, whites and greens separated, sliced
  • 4 cups shredded cabbage (from about 1/2 small head)
  • coarse salt
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 6 cups cooked rice, white or brown, preferably day-old
  • 2 ½ tablespoons fish sauce, plus more as needed
  • ½ tablespoon soy sauce, plus more as needed for serving
  • ½ cup kimchi, drained and chopped, plus more for serving
  • ½ cup green peas (thawed, if frozen)
  • fried eggs or scrambled eggs, for serving, optional
  • toasted sesame oil, for drizzling, optional
  • sriracha or other hot sauce, for serving, optional
  1. One day ahead, cook 2 cups of rice in 4 cups of water or stock. Once cool, store in the refrigerator overnight. (I used brown Basmati rice.)
  2. In a large nonstick skillet or wok over medium-high, heat 2 tablespoons oil until almost smoking. (I used a large 14-inch stainless steel skillet but a nonstick would have been preferable.)
  3. Stir in bacon, and cook, stirring constantly, until bacon is golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a heatproof bowl, leaving as much oil in the skillet as you can.
  4. Add scallion whites to the pan. Cook until soft, stirring frequently, 1 to 2 minutes. If the pan looks dry, drizzle in a little more oil, then stir in cabbage and a pinch of salt. Cook, continuing to stir frequently, until cabbage is soft, 2 to 4 minutes.
  5. Stir in garlic, and cook until fragrant, another 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to the bowl with the bacon.
  6. Add remaining 3 tablespoons oil to skillet and raise heat to high.
  7. Add rice, and a large pinch of salt, then toss thoroughly to coat with oil. Spread out rice in an even layer along the bottom (and sides if in a wok), and drizzle fish sauce and soy sauce over. Let rice sit until sizzling stops and it starts to crackle and crisp, 1 to 4 minutes. Toss, taste, and add more fish sauce or soy sauce if necessary.
  8. Fold in bacon mixture, kimchi and peas, then transfer to plates.
  9. Top with scallion greens, more kimchi to taste, and fried eggs, if using. (I served it with one fried egg per person.)
  10. Drizzle everything with toasted sesame oil and soy sauce, as desired, and serve immediately with hot sauce on the side.

Green Curry Pork Tenderloin

While I’m sharing delicious green sauces, I have another one to share… Thai green curry this time. 🙂 Using prepared curry paste is a wonderful shortcut, making this dish an elegant weeknight meal.

This dish comes from my favorite column, R.S.V.P., in Bon Appetit magazine. Subscribers write in to request recipes for dishes that stayed in their minds after dining out. This recipe was adapted from Root Down in Denver, Colorado. I doubled the meat and marinade, and increased the amount of garlic and the cooking time (internal meat temperature).

We ate it with steamed spinach over brown Basmati rice. I served the tenderloin over the spinach and rice so that every component was smothered in the wonderful sauce.

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

For the Tenderloin:

  •  1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup (4 T) fresh orange juice
  • 2 T pure maple syrup
  • 2 T toasted sesame oil
  • 2 pork tenderloins (about 1 to 1½ pounds each)
  • coarse salt
  • 1 T grapeseed or vegetable oil

For the Sauce & Assembly:

  • 1 T plus ½ cup grapeseed or vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 medium shallot, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • ¼ cup prepared green curry paste
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest (from 1 lime)
  • 1 14.5-ounce can unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 T agave nectar
  • 1 T fresh lime juice
  • ¼ cup cilantro leaves, plus more for serving
  • Unsalted, roasted pumpkin seeds (pepitas; for serving)
  • 1 to 2 pounds spinach, steamed until wilted, for serving
  • brown Basmati rice, for serving
  1.  Combine soy sauce, orange juice, maple syrup, and sesame oil in a large resealable plastic bag. Add tenderloin meat; close bag, pressing out air. Chill, turning once, 4–12 hours.
  2. Remove tenderloin from marinade and pat dry; discard marinade. Season lightly with salt.
  3. Preheat oven to 250°.
  4. Heat grapeseed oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high.
  5. Cook tenderloin, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides, about 2 minutes per side, 5 minutes total.
  6. Transfer pan to the oven and roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of tenderloin registers 135°, 20–25 minutes.
  7. Transfer to a cutting board; let rest at least 10 minutes before slicing.
  8. While meat is cooking, heat 1 T oil in a large saucepan over medium.
  9. Cook shallot and garlic, stirring often, until softened, about 3 minutes.
  10. Add curry paste and lime zest and cook, stirring constantly, until paste is slightly darkened in color and very fragrant, about 4 minutes.
  11. Add coconut milk, bring to a simmer, and cook until reduced by half, 20–25 minutes. Let curry mixture cool.
  12. Transfer curry mixture to a blender and add agave, lime juice, ¼ cup cilantro, and 2 T water; blend until very smooth.
  13. With motor running, add remaining ½ cup oil in a steady stream; blend until sauce is thick and emulsified. Transfer to a small saucepan and heat over medium just until warmed through.
  14. Serve pork over prepared rice and steamed spinach, topped with sauce, cilantro, and pumpkin seeds.

Do Ahead: Sauce can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Three Years Ago:

Four Years Ago:

Soba Noodles with Shiitake Mushrooms & Bok Choy

This is an Asian inspired noodle dish adapted from one of my favorite cookbooks, Field of Greens: New Vegetarian Recipes from the Celebrated Greens Restaurant by Annie Somerville. It is so “out of the box” for me! I don’t make a lot of Asian food…. but we do eat a lot of pasta. 🙂

I first made this dish when I received baby bok choy in my CSA box and didn’t know what to do with it. Now, I’m hooked on this recipe. It has so many wonderful fresh flavors- bok choy, shiitakes, fresh ginger, cilantro, scallions- not to mention the flavor from the peanut and sesame oils. It also has a spicy kick from the jalapeño. Super tasty.

Serves 2 to 4

  • 1/4 pound fresh shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/2 large or 2-3 small heads of bok choy or 6+ baby bok choy
  • coarse salt
  • 6 ounces thin dried buckwheat or soba noodles
  • 2 T peanut oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2/3 T grated fresh ginger
  • 1 jalapeño or serrano chile, seeded, cut in half lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 1-2 scallions, thinly sliced on a diagonal
  • 1 T dark sesame oil
  • 2 T mirin (sweet cooking sake)
  • 2 T light soy sauce
  • 2 T coarsely chopped cilantro
  • 1 tsp sesame seed, toasted, optional
  1. Set a large pot of water on the stove to boil.
  2. Remove the mushroom stems and cut the caps into 1/2-inch slices. (The stems can be saved for stock.)
  3. For small heads of bok choy, slice the stem lengthwise, leaving leaf and stem together. For a large head, slice the stems diagonally, 3/4-inch thick, and slice the leaves into 2-inch wide ribbons.
  4. When the water boils, add 1 teaspoon of salt. Add the noodles and cook as directed on the package.
  5. While the pasta is cooking, heat the peanut oil in a large sauté pan; add the shiitake mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Sauté over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes, then add the garlic, ginger, chilies, and bok choy and sauté for 2 minutes.
  6. Drain the pasta in a colander when it is just tender. Reduce the heat under the sauté pan and add the scallion, sesame oil, mirin, and soy sauce. Quickly add the noodles, taking care not to overcook the bok choy.
  7. Remove from the heat, toss the noodles with the vegetables and cilantro, and season with salt to taste, if necessary. Sprinkle with the sesame seed, if using.

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