Turkey à la King

Is it okay to make a comfort food dish using leftovers from a comfort food meal? Hope so! 😉

This dish reminds me of a chicken dish that I used to make –long ago– for my husband served over waffles. No wonder he loved this upgraded version! It was a wonderful way to use the rest of our leftover Thanksgiving turkey. It would also be fabulous with rotisserie chicken meat.

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Sam Sifton. I doubled the recipe to accommodate all of my leftover turkey. We ate this creamy concoction with my favorite Sweet Potato Biscuits, but it would also be amazing served over waffles, as a crepe filling, or with noodles. My son ate some over toast. Great.

  • 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter
  • 2-3 T olive oil
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 to 3 1/2 cups turkey or chicken stock, low-sodium if store-bought
  • 1 pound sliced mushrooms, ideally wild (I used cremini mushrooms)
  • 3 cups shredded cooked turkey or rotisserie chicken
  • cup heavy cream or half & half
  • cups frozen peas
  • tablespoons dry sherry
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • finely chopped parsley, for garnish
  1. Make a roux. In a small saucepan set over medium heat, melt 4 tablespoons of the butter. When it begins to foam, sprinkle the flour over it, and whisk to combine, then continue whisking until it begins to turn the color of straw, approximately 7-10 minutes.
  2. Slowly add 1 cup of the stock to this mixture, and stir to combine. Add more stock to thin the sauce. Keep warm.
  3. Set a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, and add the olive oil.
  4. Add the mushrooms, and cook, until the mushrooms have released their moisture and begun to get glossy and soft, approximately 7-10 minutes.
  5. Add the turkey (or chicken), then the warm sauce and cream, and stir to combine.
  6. Add the peas, then cook, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is hot and has thickened slightly, approximately 7-10 minutes.
  7. Stir in the sherry, adjust seasonings and serve over biscuits or toast, rice or buttered noodles, or as a crepe filling or waffle topping, garnished with the parsley.

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Coarse Mustard & Brown Sugar Glazed Pork Tenderloin

This simple (five ingredient!), mildly sweet, pork tenderloin dish was a quick and elegant meal. After marinating, it was ready to serve in 30 minutes. We ate it with roasted potatoes and a mound of sautéed greens on the side. Wonderful.

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Marian Burros. It was first published in 1989 but recently republished as a classic.

Yield: Serves 6

  • 2 pork tenderloins (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
  • 6 tablespoons light brown sugar
  • 4 tablespoons whole grain mustard
  • 4 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
  • 4 tablespoons dry sherry

  1. Pat the tenderloins dry with paper towels.
  2. Combine the remaining ingredients in a ziplock bag and shake to combine. Add pork tenderloins and turn to coat well with marinade. Marinate for 15 minutes or as long as overnight. (I marinated the meat for 6 hours with great success.)
  3. Drain pork of excess marinade and season with salt and pepper.
  4. Broil the tenderloins in the oven – about 10 minutes on one side, then turn, baste with marinade, and broil for approximately 5 additional minutes, or until the internal temperature is 135 degrees. (Alternately, heat a charcoal or gas grill to high; bank coals or turn off burner on one side.)
  5. Remove and lightly tent with foil. Let rest about 10 minutes before slicing into 1/4- to 1/2-inch slices.

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Wild Rice & Mushroom Soup

When my friend, Julie of Hostess at Heart, posted this mouthwatering soup, I knew that I had to make it for my mushroom-loving Thanksgiving guests. (My family!) It was very well received. 🙂

I adapted the recipe by cooking the wild rice on the stove top in an enameled cast iron pot instead of in the oven. I made it in advance and froze it without any issues. It was earthy, full-flavored, and absolutely fabulous.

Yield: Serves 12

  • 1 1/2 cups wild rice
  • 4 1/2 cups water
  • 
2 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled, plus 8 additional cloves, minced
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 0.4 ounces dried shiitake mushrooms (I used a combination of dried portobello & shiitakes)
  • 6 T unsalted butter
  • 24 oz cremini mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 medium or 1 1/2 large yellow onions, chopped fine
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • 1 cup dry sherry
  • 6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 1/2 T light soy sauce
  • 6 T cornstarch
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
  • 6 T minced fresh chives, plus more for garnish, optional
  1. Bring water, thyme, bay leaf, 2 garlic cloves, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, and baking soda to boil in a 4 quart saucepan over medium heat. Add rice and return to a boil. (I used an enameled cast iron pot.)
  2. Cover saucepan and cook until rice is tender, about 55 minutes.
  3. Strain rice through a fine-mesh strainer set in a 4-cup liquid measuring cup; discard thyme, bay leaf, and garlic. Add enough water to reserved cooking liquid to measure 4 1/2 cups.
  4. Grind shiitake mushrooms in a spice grinder until finely ground. (You should have about 4 1/2 tablespoons.)
  5. Melt butter in Dutch oven over medium to medium-high heat.
  6. Add cremini mushrooms, onions, minced garlic, tomato paste, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, and 1 1/2 teaspoons pepper.
  7. Cook stirring occasionally, until vegetables are browned and dark fond develops on bottom of pot, about 15 minutes.
  8. Add sherry, scraping up any browned bits, and cook until reduced and pot is almost dry, about 2 minutes.
  9. Add ground mushrooms, reserved rice cooking liquid, chicken broth, and soy sauce and bring to boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, until onion and mushroom are tender, about 20 minutes.
  10. In a small bowl, place 6 tablespoons of simmering liquid from pot and whisk in the cornstarch.
  11. Stir cornstarch slurry into soup, return to simmer, and cook until thickened, about 2 minutes.
  12. Remove pot from heat and stir in cooked rice, cream, chives, and lemon zest.
  13. Cover and let stand for 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

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