Firehouse Chili Gumbo

This is the last “soup” that I have to share (for now!) in my cozy soup series. 😉 It would be perfect for any Super Bowl Sunday feast. It was layered with flavor.

The recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Sam Sifton. The original recipe was adapted from the one that a Louisiana firefighter named Jeremy Chauvin entered into a national cook-off run by Hormel Foods in 2017, and that took home the prize for America’s Best Firehouse Chili. It uses a roux as a base, making it a chili “gumbo.” I substituted ground turkey for the ground beef.

Yield: Serves 8 to 10

For the Chili:

  • 2 tablespoons neutral oil, like canola or grapeseed
  • 3 pounds ground beef or ground turkey, ideally coarse-ground
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 2 teaspoons ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper, or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons chile powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3 tablespoons steak sauce (I substituted soy sauce)
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 28-ounce cans diced tomatoes

For the Gumbo:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 large yellow onion, peeled and diced
  • 2 medium shallots, peeled and diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, diced
  • 3 ribs celery, trimmed and diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 2 6-ounce cans tomato paste
  • 2 8-ounce cans tomato sauce
  • 1 to 2 cups tomato juice
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon apple-cider vinegar, or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons hot sauce, or to taste

For Serving:

  • sliced scallions, shredded sharp cheddar cheese, and/or tortilla chips, for garnish, as desired
  • corn bread or corn muffins, optional
  1. Make the chili. Heat the oil in a large skillet or heavy-bottomed pot set over medium-high heat. (I used an enameled cast iron pot.)
  2. Working in batches, cook the ground meat, stirring often, until it has begun to brown at the edges. Using a slotted spoon, transfer browned meat to a bowl.
  3. Pour off excess fat, turn heat down to medium and return the browned meat to the skillet or pot.
  4. Add salt, peppers, chile powder, turmeric, oregano and cumin, and stir to combine.
  5. Add steak sauce/soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce and diced tomatoes, and stir again. Cover the skillet or pot, and cook, stirring a few times, for 15 minutes or so.
  6. Make the gumbo. Place a large pot with a heavy bottom over medium heat, and put the butter and oil into it. When the butter is melted and foaming, sprinkle the flour into the pan, and whisk to combine. Continue whisking until the mixture is golden brown, approximately 15 to 20 minutes.
  7. Add the onion, shallots, bell peppers, celery and garlic, and cook, stirring often, until the vegetables have started to soften, approximately 10 to 15 minutes.
  8. Make the chili gumbo. Add the beef mixture to the pot with the vegetables along with the tomato paste, tomato sauce, tomato juice and ketchup, and stir to combine. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 30 to 45 minutes, then add apple-cider vinegar and hot sauce to taste.
  9. Take the pot off the heat, and serve, or allow to cool and refrigerate overnight to allow the flavors to cure. Heat before serving.
  10. Serve garnished with scallions, shredded cheese, and/or tortilla chips, as desired.

One Year Ago: Squash & Pork Stir-Fry

Two Years Ago: Duchess Baked Potatoes

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Four Years Ago:

Five Years Ago:

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Winter Squash & Red Bean Mole

This is an another amazing vegetarian chili variation. Hearty too. It was especially wonderful for me as well because it incorporated a lot of flavors typically used in a traditional Mexican mole, one of my absolute loves.

This recipe was adapted from The Moosewood Restaurant Table: 250 Brand-New Recipes from the Natural Foods Restaurant that Revolutionized Eating in America from the Moosewood Collective. I doubled the recipe, increased the garlic, and omitted the ground fennel. We ate it with corn muffins and a green salad. Fabulous!

Yield: Serves 8 to 12

  • 4 T olive oil
  • 3 cups chopped yellow onions (I used 2 large onions)
  • 10-12 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tsp ground fennel seeds, optional
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 T chopped fresh thyme of 2 tsp dried thyme
  • 3 tsp coarse salt
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2/3 cup chopped celery
  • 1 cup seeded and chopped poblano peppers (can substitute cubanelle peppers)
  • 3 cups seeded and chopped red, yellow, or orange bell peppers (I used 2 red, 1 yellow, & 1 orange)
  • 6 cups diced butternut squash (bite-size cubes), from 1 medium butternut squash
  • 28-oz can diced tomatoes
  • 2 2/3 cups water
  • 6 T pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
  • 2 T sesame seeds
  • 2 15-oz cans red kidney beans, drained
  • 1-2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, finely chopped, or to taste
  • 3 oz bittersweet chocolate (I used 72% cacao dark chocolate)
  • 1 cup chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish
  • sour cream, for garnish
  • thinly sliced scallions, for garnish
  1. In a heavy bottomed pot on medium heat, warm the oil. (I used an enameled cast iron pot.)
  2. Add the onions, garlic, fennel, cinnamon, thyme, salt, and black pepper and cook for 5 to 7 minutes until the onions soften, stirring often to prevent sticking.
  3. Add the celery, poblano peppers, and bell peppers and cook for another 5 minutes until the peppers brighten and become fragrant.
  4. Stir in the squash and cook for a minute or two more.
  5. Add the tomatoes and water to the pot, cover, bring to a boil.
  6. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the squash is tender.
  7. Using a spice grinder, mini food processor, or a mortar and pestle, finely grind the pepitas and sesame seeds.
  8. When the squash is tender, stir the ground seeds, kidney beans, chipotles to taste, and chocolate into the stew. Simmer for 10 to 15 minutes.
  9. Stir in the cilantro.
  10. Garnish with more cilantro, sliced scallions, and/or sour cream, as desired.

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Mexican Lentil Soup with Roasted Garlic & Chilies

It’s been a while. :/ Belated Happy New Year! 🙂 Although I haven’t been posting, I have been cooking, of course.

It has been absolutely freezing here. Freezing. My husband requests some sort of chili or stew for dinner in cold weather. Needless to say, I have a handful of wonderful new cold weather soups to share.

This vegetarian “chili” incorporated both ancho and chipotle chiles as well as roasted garlic. My favorites! 🙂 I also loved the pop of flavor from all of the fresh herbs. It was flavorful and fabulous. An added bonus was that the flavors developed over time and the soup was even better the following day.

This recipe was adapted from one of my favorite vegetarian cookbooks, Fields of Greens: New Vegetarian Recipes from the Celebrated Greens Restaurant by Annie Somerville. I doubled the recipe, increased the lentils and tomatoes, used whole San Marzano tomatoes, substituted fresh thyme for oregano, and increased the heat by using additional chipotle chile puree.  I also modified the technique to roast the garlic.

Yield: Serves 10

  • 1 pound of brown lentils
  • 12 cups cold water
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 fresh sage leaves
  • 2 fresh oregano or thyme sprigs
  • 2 heads of garlic
  • 4 T extra-virgin olive oil
  • 28 oz canned whole San Marzano tomatoes, with juice
  • 2 red onions, diced, about 4 cups
  • coarse salt
  • 2 tsp cumin seed, toasted and ground
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 2 carrots, diced, about 1 cup
  • 2 small red and/or yellow bell peppers, diced, about 1 cup
  • 4 T Ancho Chile Purée (from 1 large or 2 small chiles, see below)
  • 1 tsp Chipotle Purée, (from 1 chile in adobo sauce) plus more, to taste (I added an additional 1/2 tsp)
  • 2 T chopped cilantro, plus more for garnish, as desired
  • 2 T chopped fresh oregano, for garnish
  1. Sort and rinse the lentils and place them in a soup pot with the water, bay leaves, sage, and oregano/thyme sprig.
  2. Bring the water to a boil, reduce the heat, and cook, uncovered, at a gentle boil for 15 to 20 minutes, until the lentils are tender. Remove the herbs.
  3. While the lentils are cooking, preheat the oven to 350 degrees, preferably on convection. Rub the whole garlic heads with a little olive oil, wrap them together in a packet of aluminum foil, and seal it closed. Place directly on the oven rack and roast for about 30 minutes, until soft.
  4. When the garlic has cooled, slice off the top of each head and squeeze the garlic out of its skin. Purée with the tomatoes in a blender or food processor and set aside.
  5. Make the Ancho Chile Purée: Pull the chile(s) apart at the stem end and remove the seeds. Place in a small bowl and cover with hot water, allowing to soak for 15 to 20 minutes, until softened. Place in a blender or food processor; add a small amount of the soaking liquid and process to a smooth purée, adding more liquid if needed.
  6. Make the Chipotle Chile Purée: Using a blender or food processor, purée one whole chile with additional adobo sauce until smooth. Unused purée can be stored in a jar in the refrigerator.
  7. Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan. (I used a 4 quart pot.) Add the onion, 1 teaspoon of salt, the cumin, and the dried oregano; sauté over medium heat until the onion is soft, about 7 to 8 minutes.
  8. Add the carrot and peppers and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes.
  9. Add the chile purées, the puréed tomatoes and garlic, and 2 teaspoons of salt; simmer for 10 minutes.
  10. Combine the beans and their broth with the vegetables, partially cover, and cook over low heat for 30 minutes. Add salt to taste.
  11. Adjust heat, as desired, by adding additional ancho or chipotle purée. (I added an additional 1/2 tsp chipotle.)
  12. Sprinkle in fresh herbs (cilantro and/or oregano), as desired, just before serving.

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Gratin of Eggplant, Roasted Red Peppers, & Garlic

IMG_5528

This is my kind of dish- it has over 30 cloves of garlic! It is wonderful for late summer; I was able to incorporate my beautiful CSA long red peppers and eggplant. I used canned tomatoes in the sauce but fresh would have been fabulous too. I did have one regret though…. the eggplant was sliced too thick (3/4-inch thick per the recipe) and the texture was too meaty. Next time, I would slice the eggplant much thinner, about 1/4-inch thick. This recipe was adapted from Fields of Greens: New Vegetarian Recipes from the Celebrated Greens Restaurant by Annie Somerville. We ate it with bread on the side; polenta or noodles would also be great.

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

For the Tomato Sauce:

  • 1 T olive oil
  • 1/2 medium-size yellow or sweet onion, diced, about 1 cup
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano or marjoram
  • coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup dry red wine
  • 1 1/2 pounds fresh tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped, about 2 cups, or 1 16-ounce can tomatoes with their juice, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf

For the Gratin:

  • 4 pounds Japanese eggplant, sliced on a diagonal (I used 4 slender standard eggplants)
  • 4 1/2 T extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp coarse salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 24 unpeeled garlic cloves
  • 2 medium-sized red or yellow bell peppers, roasted, peeled, sliced 1/2-inch thick (I used 3 long red peppers)
  • 2 T chopped fresh herbs: marjoram, Italian parsley, and thyme
  • Tomato sauce
  • 1 cup grated Fontina cheese
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  1. Make the tomato sauce: Heat the oil in a medium-size saucepan; add the onion, basil, 1/2 tsp salt, and a few pinches of pepper. Sauté over medium heat until the onion is soft, about 7 to 8 minutes, then add the garlic and sauté for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the wine and simmer a minute or two to reduce; when the pan is almost dry, add the tomatoes and the bay leaf. Reduce the heat to low and cook 30 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. IMG_5511
  2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Toss the eggplant with 3 T of the olive oil, the chopped garlic, 1/2 tsp salt, and a few pinches of pepper. Place on a baking sheet. Toss the whole garlic cloves with a little olive oil and place alongside the eggplant; bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the eggplant is soft to the touch and the garlic is soft but still holds its shape. Set aside to cool.
  3. Roast the peppers: Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper. Slice each pepper in half lengthwise and remove the stems, seeds, and membranes. Lay the pepper halves cut side down on the baking sheet, brush lightly with oil (I use an olive-oil mister), and roast until the skins darken and blister, about 15 minutes. Remove the peppers from the oven, transfer to a bowl and cover; the peppers will steam as they cool. After 10 minutes, slip off the skins. Slice 1/2-inch thick.
  4. Carefully peel the cooled garlic and toss it with the sliced roasted red pepper strips, the remaining olive oil and salt, a few pinches of pepper, and half the chopped herbs. IMG_5510
  5. Pour the tomato sauce into the bottom of a 9- by 13-inch baking dish, and layer the eggplant nearly upright (not flat) in rows across the width of the dish, overlapping the slices as you go. Continue to layer, packing the slices close together, until you’ve used all the eggplant. Tuck the pepper strips and garlic cloves in between the eggplant slices and sprinkle with the Fontina. IMG_5515
  6. Cover and bake for 20 minutes, then sprinkle with the Parmesan. Bake, uncovered, for another 10 minutes, until bubbly. Sprinkle the remaining herbs over the gratin just before serving.

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