Pullman Loaf

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I am obsessed with my Pullman loaf pan- I just love the shape and the resulting presentation. πŸ™‚ I have been using it for quick breads and had yet to use it with the lid. With the lid in place, the resulting bread has an almost square shape. It was crispy on the outside and tender on the inside, and, of course, pretty! This recipe was adapted from Martha Stewart’s Baking Handbook; I adapted the cooking times for a convection oven. We ate it with Greek Red Lentil Soup but had plenty of leftovers for sandwiches.

I’m bringing this beauty to share at Angie’s Fiesta Friday #58 over at the Novice Gardener- Enjoy!

Yield: One 12 or 13-inch loaf (depending on pan size)

  • 1 1/2 pounds bread flour, plus more for dusting (about 4 1/2 cups)
  • 3 1/2 tsp instant yeast
  • 1 1/2 T coarse salt
  • 1 1/2 T granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup nonfat dry milk
  • 2 T unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 3/4 cups warm water (about 110 degrees)
  • vegetable oil or cooking spray for the bowl and pan
  1. Β In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour, yeast, salt, sugar, dry milk, and butter.
  2. Add the warm water, and beat on low-speed until the dough is smooth, elastic, and uniform in color, about 5 minutes.
  3. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and finish kneading it by hand, about 5 times, making sure that all ingredients are fully incorporated and the dough forms a smooth ball.
  4. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour. (I used a proofing drawer.)
  5. Punch down the dough. Pull the sides into the center. Invert the dough in the bowl, so that it rests smooth side up. Cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place (proofing drawer) until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.
  6. Generously brush a 12 or 13-inch Pullman loaf pan with vegetable oil or spray with cooking spray, making sure to undercoat the underside of the lid, as well as the bottom and sides of the pan. Set aside.
  7. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface. Roll or press out the dough into a 12-by-8-inch rectangle, with the long side facing you. Starting at the top, roll the dough toward you, gently pressing as you go to form a tight log. Pat the ends to make even. Gently roll the log back and forth to seal the final seam.
  8. Place the loaf, seam side down, in the prepared pan, and slide the lid three-quarters of the way closed. Let rise in a warm place (proofing drawer) until the dough is almost touching the lid, 45 to 60 minutes. (I let mine rise a little bit too long because the dough rose to touch the lid…) IMG_2693
  9. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425 degrees (convection).
  10. Close the lid completely and bake, rotating the pan halfway through, until the loaf is light golden brown, about 30 minutes (on convection) to 45 minutes in a standard oven. Reduce the temperature to 350 degrees, re-close the lid, and continue baking another 25 to 30 minutes.
  11. Transfer pan to a wire rack to cool for 10 minutes. (The bread should have a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom. If not, continue baking, covered, checking at 5-minute intervals, until the crust is deep golden brown.)
  12. Remove bread from pan, and let cool completely before slicing. The bread can be wrapped in plastic and kept at room temperature for up to 4 days.

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About Josette@thebrookcook

I live in Stony Brook, New York on Long Island. I love garlic and baking. My hobby (and love) is to try new recipes. My favorite recipe resources include The New York Times, Food and Wine, Bon Appetit, and Martha Stewart Living. Enjoy!

25 responses to “Pullman Loaf

  1. What a beautiful looking loaf, and I like the look of the tin as well. I keep meaning to make bread more often as we get through quite a bit in our house. I’m not sure they would look as pretty as this, though! Thanks for sharing with Fiesta Friday.

  2. Pingback: Fiesta Friday #58 | The Novice Gardener

  3. I love baking breads myself and bake a big loaf every weekend.. this is a stunning loaf ! and.. may i say i love that Tin.. i have been looking for good tin myself.. where did u get such a tin ?

  4. beautiful perfect loaf.

  5. wow looks lie a bakery loaf – amazing, no wonder you love that pan

  6. I think my grandma had long slender pans like that but I have never seen one with a lid. This may be a silly question but does baking the bread with the lid on make the bread different in some way?

    • Yes! It keeps the top from becoming round- the resulting loaf was an almost perfect rectangle! I don’t use the top to make quick breads, I just love the shape. It shortens the baking time too.

  7. This looks awesome, I love the shape the lid gives it!

  8. Gorgeous! What a beautiful loaf! 😍

  9. Impressive loaf of bread, Josette! Great…now I want (rather, need) another kitchen tool! I think I can see why you’re obsessed with the pan.

  10. Adria

    What is the temperature if you are not using a convection oven?

  11. Pingback: Honey-Oat Pain de Mie - #BreadBakers | Hostess At Heart

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