Turkey Corn Chowder with Bacon

This chowder was the best use of leftover turkey I’ve found so far. It was so wonderful, it may have to become the traditional recipe for leftover Thanksgiving turkey in my house. It was loaded with flavor and topped with bacon. A guaranteed crowd-pleaser.

This recipe was adapted from Epicurious.com, contributed by Rhoda Boone. It would also be wonderful with shredded rotisserie chicken.

Yield: Serves 8

  • 6 slices bacon (4 ounces)
  • 1 medium or large yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 medium carrot, sliced into 1/4-inch thick rounds (halved lengthwise if large)
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 1/2 medium jalapeño, finely chopped, plus more to taste
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 6 cups (48 ounces) homemade or store-bought chicken or turkey stock
  • 1 medium sweet potato (about 1 pound), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • Two 4-ounce cans mild diced green chiles, drained
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 4 cups shredded turkey or rotisserie chicken
  • 10 ounces frozen corn, thawed
  • 3/4 cup half-and-half, plus more to taste
  • sliced scallions, for serving
  • chopped parsley, for serving
  1. In a large pot over medium heat, cook bacon until crisp, 8 to 10 minutes.
  2. Drain on a paper towel and crumble into small pieces and set aside, reserving the fat in the pot. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon fat, and save for another use.
  3. Return the pot to medium heat, and add onion, carrot, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes.
  4. Add bell pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes more.
  5. Add jalapeño and cumin and cook, stirring, 1 minute more.
  6. Add stock, sweet potato, chiles, oregano, and bay leaves and bring to a simmer. Cook until sweet potato is tender, about 10 minutes.
  7. Stir in the turkey or chicken and corn and cook until warmed through, 3 to 5 minutes.
  8. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and half-and-half. Continue to cook until just warmed through.
  9. Taste and adjust seasoning, thinning the chowder with another 1/4 cup half-and-half, if desired.
  10. Serve chowder topped with crumbled bacon, scallions, and parsley.

Slow Cooker Lentil Soup with Italian Sausage & Greens

I actually have a third tasty soup to share. This one is reminiscent of one of our family favorites, Lentil-Kielbasa Soup. Don’t worry- it’s not so similar that it will prevent me from making my tried and true lentil-sausage soup as well this season. 🙂

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Sarah Digregorio. I used French green lentils instead of black lentils, modified the proportions and incorporated a mixture of CSA greens including beet greens, broccoli greens and escarole. I also garnished the soup with my CSA parsley instead of basil.

This soup could easily be made on the stove top instead of in a slow cooker. I loved that it gobbled up my CSA greens too.

Yield: 6 servings

  • 1 pound hot or sweet Italian pork sausage, loose or removed from its casing
  • olive oil, if necessary
  • 1 large red or yellow onion, chopped
  • Kosher salt
  • 10 large garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 3 thyme sprigs
  • 2 oregano sprigs, leaves only, or 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • generous pinch of red-pepper flakes
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cup dry white wine (I used Pinot Grigio)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 cups dried lentils, preferably black beluga (I used French green lentils)
  • 1 (14-ounce) can whole or chopped tomatoes
  • 8 cups chicken stock
  • 5 ounces greens, such as baby spinach or kale, or 1 medium bunch greens, such as chard or kale, stemmed and chopped (I used a mixture of beet & broccoli greens with escarole)
  • 1 T red-wine vinegar
  • chopped fresh parsley or basil, for garnish
  • grated Parmigiano Reggiano, for garnish
  1.  In a large, dry skillet over medium-high heat, cook the sausage, breaking it up with a spatula, until it is in small, coarse pieces, and starts to brown and sizzle in its own fat, about 8 minutes.
  2. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked sausage to a 5- to 8-quart slow cooker. There should be a thin layer of fat covering the bottom of the skillet. If there is much more than that, pour a bit of the fat off. If there is not enough fat to cover the bottom of the pan, add a drizzle of olive oil.
  3. Add the onion to the skillet, season generously with salt, and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and translucent, about 5 minutes.
  4. Reduce heat to medium-low, add garlic and cook until softened and fragrant, about 2 minutes.
  5. Add the onion and garlic powders, the herbs, red pepper flakes and several generous grinds of black pepper. Stir to combine.
  6. Increase heat to medium-high, pour in the wine and stir well, scraping the bottom of the pot. Let the wine bubble until the pan is almost dry, about 3 minutes.
  7. Scrape the skillet mixture into the slow cooker with the sausage.
  8. Add the bay leaf and the lentils.
  9. Add the tomatoes with their juice. If using whole, crush the tomatoes into pieces using your hands as you add them with their juice.
  10. Pour in the chicken stock.
  11. Season generously with pepper and add 1/2 teaspoon salt if you are using low-sodium stock or 1 teaspoon salt if using homemade unsalted stock. Do not add salt now if you are using fully salted stock.
  12. Stir well to combine all ingredients. Cover and cook on low until the lentils are tender, about 6 to 8 hours. (Taste the lentils to make sure they are firm but creamy on the inside; black lentils can vary in their cooking time depending on their age and the heat of your slow cooker.) The soup holds well on warm for 2 additional hours.
  13. Switch the heat to high. Remove and discard the thyme sprigs. Stir in the greens and cook until wilted and tender, about 2 minutes for baby spinach, 10 minutes for kale.
  14. Stir in the vinegar.
  15. Serve in bowls, topped with chopped parsley and/or basil and grated Parmesan.

Red Lentil Soup with Lemon

I have two hearty soups to share. Perfect to serve for dinner on a chilly night. This red lentil soup is healthy, delicious, and quick to prepare.

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Melissa Clark. I doubled the recipe, modified the proportions, and puréed the finished soup to create a uniform texture. I served it with warm naan and green salad.

Yield: 8 servings

  • 6 tablespoons olive oil, more for drizzling
  • 2 large yellow onions, chopped
  • 8 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 T tomato paste
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt, more to taste
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp ground Chile powder, more to taste
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne, more to taste
  • 2 quarts chicken or vegetable stock (I used 1 quart of homemade turkey stock & 1 quart of chicken stock)
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 cups red lentils
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and diced
  • juice and zest of 1 lemon, more to taste
  • 6 T chopped fresh cilantro, more for garnish
  1. In a large pot, heat oil over high heat until hot and shimmering.
  2. Add onion and garlic, and sauté until golden, about 4 minutes.
  3. Stir in tomato paste, cumin, salt, black pepper, chili powder, and cayenne, and sauté for 2 minutes longer.
  4. Add stock, water, lentils and carrots. Bring to a simmer, then partially cover pot and turn heat to medium-low. Simmer until lentils are soft, about 30 minutes.
  5. Taste and add salt if necessary.
  6. Using an immersion or regular blender or a food processor, purée the soup then add it back to pot.
  7. Reheat soup if necessary, then stir in lemon juice and cilantro.
  8. Serve soup drizzled with good olive oil and dusted lightly with chili powder, if desired. Garnish with additional minced cilantro as well, if desired.

Pad See Ew (Thai Stir Fried Soy Sauce Noodles)

This is my fourth attempt to replicate my husband’s favorite Thai restaurant dish. This version may have been the closest so far! Apparently, he is not alone… Pad See Ew is one of the most popular noodle dishes at Thai restaurants in Western countries.

The genius part of this recipe is that the noodles are sautéed in the sauce in the absence of the other ingredients. This way, they absorb more of the sauce and caramelize on the edges. This difference in the finished dish seemed more similar to a restaurant version. Genius.

This recipe was adapted from RecipeTinEats.com. According to the site, the original source of the recipe may be David Thompson, an Australian chef dedicated to mastering Thai cooking. I doubled the recipe and used fresh wide rice noodles and my CSA bok choy. I incorporated the water but may consider reducing the amount next time.

Yield: Serves 4 to 6

Noodles:

  • 24 oz fresh wide rice noodles or 14 oz dried wide rice stick noodles

For the Sauce:

  • 1/4 cup dark soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup oyster sauce
  • 4 tsp light soy sauce
  • 2 tsp white vinegar
  • 4 tsp granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup water

For the Stir Fry:

  • 6 T peanut or vegetable oil, divided
  • 5 cloves garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 4 to 5 cooked boneless, skinless chicken thighs, sliced or shredded
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 to 4 baby bok choy or 8 stems Chinese broccoli

To Prepare the Ingredients:

  1. If using baby bok choy, cut the tender leaves into 2″ thick ribbons and cut the stems crosswise into 1/2″ pieces. (If using Chinese broccoli, trim ends, cut into 3″ pieces. Separate leaves from stems. Cut thick stems in half vertically so they’re no wider than 1/4″ thick.)
  2. If using fresh wide rice noodles, rinse in cool water and separate into large pieces. (If using dry rice noodles, prepare according tot he package directions and drain immediately before incorporating into the dish.)
  3. To make the sauce, combine the ingredients in a measuring cup and stir until the sugar dissolves.
  4. Shred or slice the cooked chicken.
  5. Thinly slice the garlic.

To Cook the Stir Fry:

  1. Heat 2 T oil in a very large heavy based skillet or wok over high heat. (I used a 14″ stainless steel skillet.)
  2. Add garlic, cook 15 seconds.
  3. Add chicken, stir.
  4. Add bok choy or Chinese broccoli stems.
  5. Add bok choy or Chinese broccoli leaves, cook until just wilted.
  6. Push everything to one side, crack eggs in and scramble.
  7. Remove everything onto a plate (scrape the pan clean).
  8. Return pan to stove, heat remaining 4 T oil over high heat.
  9. Add noodles and sauce. Toss as few times as possible (to minimize breakage), dispersing the sauce and caramelizing the edges of the noodles.
  10. Quickly add chicken and vegetable mixture back in, and toss to disperse. Serve immediately.

Acorn Squash Saltimbocca with Browned Butter Sauce

I almost exclusively roast the acorn squash that I receive in my CSA box. It’s a gold-standard crowd-pleaser. 🙂

After making and absolutely loving both a classic and a summer version of chicken saltimbocca, I was excited to try this unique acorn squash version. Unlike the chicken versions, the squash is roasted instead of fried. After roasting, the skin was tender and completely edible. The browned butter sauce made it amazing- especially because it incorporated sherry vinegar.

This recipe was adapted from Food and Wine, contributed by Ann Taylor Pittman. I reduced the amount of browned butter (and there was plenty!). I served it with roasted CSA beets, kohlrabi and potatoes along with a green salad. It was a sweet and buttery CSA feast.

I served it as a main dish but it could also be served as a seasonal side.

Yield: Serves 2 to 4 as a main dish

One-Pan Shrimp Scampi with Orzo

This is an incredibly full-flavored one-pan dish. I made it when my mom was visiting because she is such a fan of shrimp. She loved it! 🙂

This recipe was adapted from The New York Times, contributed by Ali Slagle. Fast and fabulous.

  • 1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined, patted dry
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon zest plus 1 tablespoon juice (from 1 lemon)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced, divided
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup orzo
  • cup dry white wine
  • 2 cups boiling water, seafood stock, or chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
  1. In a medium bowl, stir together the shrimp, 1 tablespoon olive oil, the lemon zest, red-pepper flakes, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper and half the garlic. Set aside to marinate (this step can be done up to 1 hour in advance).
  2. To a medium skillet, add the butter, the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and remaining minced garlic; heat over medium.
  3. When the butter starts to bubble, add the orzo and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring often, until the orzo is toasted, about 2 minutes, adjusting the heat as necessary to prevent the garlic from burning.
  4. Carefully add the wine (it will bubble) and stir until absorbed, about 1 minute.
  5. Stir in the water or stock, reduce heat to low, cover, and cook until the orzo is al dente, about 12 to 16 minutes.
  6. Add the shrimp in a snug, even layer on top of the orzo, cover, and cook until all the shrimp is pink and cooked through, 2 to 4 minutes.
  7. Remove from heat and let sit, covered, 2 minutes.
  8. Sprinkle with parsley and lemon juice, season to taste with salt and pepper and serve immediately.

Jacques Pepin’s Quick-Roasted Chicken with Mustard & Garlic

Yield: Serves 6

  • One 4 to 4 1/2-pound chicken
  • 8 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 T Dijon mustard
  • 2 T dry white or red wine
  • 2 T extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 T soy sauce
  • 1 tsp Tabasco (I used Chipotle Tabasco)
  • 1 tsp herbes de Provence
  • 1/2 tsp coarse salt
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees on convection roast or 450 degrees in a standard oven.
  2. Using poultry shears, cut along each side of the chicken backbone and remove it. Turn the chicken breast side up and press on the breast bone to flatten the chicken.
  3. Using a sharp knife, cut partway through both sides of the joint between the thighs and the drumsticks. Cut partway through the joint between the wings and the breast.
  4. In a bowl, mix all of the remaining ingredients.
  5. Turn the chicken breast down and spread it with half of the mustard mixture.
  6. Set the chicken in a large skillet skin side up; spread with the remaining mixture. (I put the chicken in a 9″x13″ pyrex dish and let it marinate in the refrigerator for 6 to 8 hours.)
  7. Transfer the chicken and marinade to a large skillet, skin side up, and place over high heat. (I used a 12″ cast iron skillet.)
  8. Cook the chicken until it starts to brown, 5 minutes.
  9. Transfer the skillet to the oven and roast the chicken for about 30 minutes, until the skin is browned and the chicken is cooked through. (I used the oven probe and roasted the chicken to an internal temperature of 165 degrees.)
  10. Let the chicken rest for 5 minutes.
  11. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board, cut it into 8 pieces and serve.
Note: The chicken can be prepared through Step 2 and refrigerated overnight.

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